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Selling a House With Problem Neighbours

By: Jeff Durham - Updated: 5 Jul 2019 | comments*Discuss
 
Neighbours House Problem House

Problem neighbours can blight an entire community. Even more serious, they can have implications on the value of your own house if you’re looking at selling a house. This begs the question of whether you should tell prospective buyers about any problems you’ve incurred with your neighbours, and run the risk of this disclosure driving down the market value of your property.

Legal Standpoint

Theoretically, it should be up to a prospective buyer to do all the fact finding when it comes to looking at a particular neighbourhood or community they’re considering moving to. After all, Problem Neighbours to some might be considered a fun, carefree person to others so it’s often subjective. However, problems will arise if a solicitor asks the seller to provide information about neighbour disputes or problems a seller has had with neighbours and the seller fails to disclose any information. If problems then occur later and the buyer has been given no reason to believe there were any problems, it can result in legal action being taken.

General Guidelines

If you’re asked by a prospective buyer about any problems you may have encountered with your neighbours when you're selling a house, it’s advisable to stick to issues that might have a marked effect on the relationship between the buyer and your neighbours if they were to go through with the purchase. Obvious examples might include disputes over land or shared house maintenance, a Dispute Over Boundary Lines or there may be some Disagreement Over The Height Of A Hedge.

However, things like music being played loudly at night or if your neighbours have noisy kids don’t need to be mentioned as these kinds of issues are often subjective anyway. Be careful though because if you’re asked to confirm any of these things in writing, you need to be very sure that the information you provide is factual, otherwise you may be sued for disclosing false information later, especially if it relates to shared land or house maintenance.

Ethical And Moral Guidelines

In general, as long as any dispute does not affect anything material about the house or property on which it stands, and you’re not being asked to disclose information in writing, you shouldn’t feel obliged to give a ‘warts and all’ account of all the problems you’ve had with a neighbour. Ethically, it might be a different matter.

For example, if your neighbour often comes home from the pub and is rowdy, or they’ve verbally abused or even assaulted you in the past, you might feel it’s morally responsible to tell any prospective buyers. After all, wouldn’t you like to be told this by the person whose house you’re buying? There's a good chance that the prospective buyer has done a thorough checking out of the local community anyway.

If you have suffered a problem with your neighbours, are looking to sell your house and you’re not sure how you should respond to any questions from prospective buyers – written or verbal – about neighbour disputes you may have encountered, your Solicitor and local Citizens’ Advice Bureau will be able to offer you practical advice.

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We have quite a large garden so have a few neighbouring properties (7 in total) along one of the boundary fences my neighbour has installed his own fence but has made his garden smaller leaving a void in between his fence and my own, leaving behind a kind of no mans land. That area has become quite overgrown with brambles and shrubs which I am finding a nightmare to hold back, the brambles especially are constantly needing cutting back and it’s difficult for us to access them properly, this is resulting in the brambles growing under the soil and popping up all over our borders around said area, they also find their way through the fence as it’s only a picket style fence. My neighbours property is council owned, ours is privately owned. What are the options legally for us, can we force the council to maintain the void, they have said we can purchase that bit of land however we cannot just take it and maintain it ourselves but it’s such a mess, as well as being overgrown it’s very uneven ground with bricks and old broken paving stones and also drops down approx 3 feet or so away from our land so I’d rather not take responsibility for it anyway. It’s also difficult for the tenants that occupy the property to maintain and it wasn’t the present tenants that installed the fence, it was done by the previous tenant who didn’t consult or inform anyone.
Boundary problem - 20-May-19 @ 11:11 AM
There were problems with the people before us living here with the neighbor next door,but it wasn't disclosed and we only found out in the day we moved in. Since we have been here she has told us to take up the slabs as she doesn't like the Welsh slate we have used, she gets on step ladders looking over, she's got the hose on us in the garden,she says I don't want to see you in the garden. She's put boards leaning up our fence panels left over from the backs of her old kitchen units. The police have been called to us,when they came round they said her problem is she doesn't like the color of your fence and your slabs. I have no idea what to do... I don't speak to her at all
Sandeee6 - 10-Oct-18 @ 8:16 PM
I want to sell my house but have been told it's worth significantly less then others in this area as my immediate neighbour is filthy with a bad day infestation, old feeders, dog poo and rubbish piled high. It's a council property. Can I sueu the council for loss of money in loosing. Incant afford to loose money or i won't be able to buy the house I want ? Thanks
Tabby - 9-Sep-18 @ 9:38 AM
I've got some serious issues with my neighbours they've committed criminal damage loads of times to the property and serious harassment. It all started over a boundary dispute. I want to sort the dispute legally before selling but the longer it goes on the more damage and harassment I have to report to the police and also disclose on the sellers legal form. Is there anyway of selling without disclosing or without effecting the sale price? My thoughts were: 1. Part exchange with a developer - they won't care as long as they get the sale but then I'd pay over the odds for a new build and I don't really want one in the 1st place. 2. Sell at auction - Do you know what needs disclosing if selling at auction? 3. Sell to one of these quick sales companies - but I think they'd not pay enough. 4. Sell to a family member with full disclosure - once the family owner has owned it for a month and not experienced any issues then they sell it and give us the money. Obviously it would need to be one we could trust and hope they would not die in the mean time meaning we'd have to pay inheritance tax on our own money. Does anyone know what sort of hit you'd take when selling a house like this in terms as a percentage? Any suggestions you have are welcomed?
Cant Sell - 22-Aug-18 @ 11:23 AM
What can l do about a meddling obnoxious neighbour who is a council tenant whoranted and shouted at the perspective buyers and is trying to sabotage sale of my home? We have done nothing other than minding our business and keeping ourselves private. Any suggesstions? S
S - 19-Jun-18 @ 4:21 PM
chris - Your Question:
Hi, we bought a mid-terraced house 3 years ago. We were told by the agents the previous owners were away a lot and moving closer to work. We've had a problem neighbour on one side who has caused multiple rows with her kids noise, music, banging, shouting. We've referred to the council and because our neighbour calmed down when thy were involved, they took it no further. we've also gone through mediation and soundproofed the party wall downstairs. We just want away before we lose all sanity. In all reality how much info do we need to divulge,?given noise is somewhat subjective, we don't have children ourselves.

Our Response:
This depends on how the question is posed on the sellers information questionnaire. It's usually best to be completely honest.
ProblemNeighbours - 7-Sep-17 @ 9:57 AM
Hi, we bought a mid-terraced house 3 years ago. We were told by the agents the previous owners were away a lot and moving closer to work. We've had a problem neighbour on one side who has caused multiple rows with her kids noise, music, banging, shouting. We've referred to the council and because our neighbour calmed down when thy were involved, they took it no further. we've also gone through mediation and soundproofed the party wall downstairs. We just want away before we lose all sanity. In all reality how much info do we need to divulge,?given noise is somewhat subjective, we don't have children ourselves.
chris - 5-Sep-17 @ 8:52 AM
SJM - Your Question:
We live on an end terrace and have a neighbour to one side, this property was sold 9 months a go. Apart from a little bit of music here and there we haven't been bothered by them, the music wasn't loud enough for us to complain to them. We assumed the music was an attempt by them to drown out our new born baby who could scream the house down at regular intervals. The only time we have complained to them was when they were once decorating late at night, we nocked on the door asking them to stop because of the noise / baby, they apologised and stopped immediately We have just put our house up for sale and it sold on the same day. The owner of the house 2 doors down has come round and asked if we are moving out because of the shared neighbour as he has had numerous complaints from his tenants about them. We told him that it wasn't and we have been looking for a property to purchase for some time. He said that there have been a few incidents involving them and his tenants and the police were involved at one point. He went onto say that the property was bought by a charity called Mind who have placed people in the property with mental health issues.Whilst I was shocked that the charity could do this without prior notification we have not had any issues ourselves. What should we disclose as part of the selling process? Will any of the other neighbour complaints come up when our buyer carries out searches on the property?

Our Response:
The question is usually posed in the seller's information at as part of the sale, it usually relates to your own experiences with neighbours and if the authorities have been involvedat all. You can probably answer it honestly without jeaopardizing a sale.
ProblemNeighbours - 9-Aug-17 @ 11:42 AM
We live on an end terrace and have a neighbour to one side, this property was sold 9 months a go. Apart from a little bit of music here and there we haven't been bothered by them, the music wasn't loud enough for us to complain to them. We assumed the music was an attempt by them to drown out our new born baby who could scream the house down at regular intervals. The only time we have complained to them was when they were once decorating late at night, we nocked on the door asking them to stop because of the noise / baby, they apologised and stopped immediately We have just put our house up for sale and it sold on the same day. The owner of the house 2 doors down has come round and asked if we are moving out because of the shared neighbour as he has had numerous complaints from his tenants about them. We told him that it wasn't and we have been looking for a property to purchase for some time. He said that there have been a few incidents involving them and his tenants and the police were involved at one point. He went onto say that the property was bought by a charity called Mind who have placed people in the property with mental health issues. Whilst I was shocked that the charity could do this without prior notification we have not had any issues ourselves. What should we disclose as part of the selling process? Will any of the other neighbour complaints come up when our buyer carries out searches on the property?
SJM - 7-Aug-17 @ 4:00 PM
Rox - Your Question:
I have complained to my neighbours landlord about their parties, they went quiet for a bit but have started up again and I want to complain again. I'm also planning on selling my house as I just can't handle them anymore. Do I need to disclose this to potential buyers?

Our Response:
If you have made a complaint to a neighbour, their landlord or another authority such as the council, you will have to declare it.
ProblemNeighbours - 27-Jun-17 @ 11:56 AM
I have complained to my neighbours landlord about their parties, they went quiet for a bit but have started up again and I want to complain again. I'm also planning on selling my house as I just can't handle them anymore. Do I need to disclose this to potential buyers?
Rox - 24-Jun-17 @ 11:41 PM
Ive put my house up for sale, I'm not having much luck as i have two neighbours on my row that are filthy leaving everything they can in their front garden. This includes glass, bed frames etc. How can i sort this out?
Serene - 18-Jun-17 @ 8:22 PM
Our neighbours child is autistic and disturbs our family constantly with internal and external noise to the point the council have agreed to soundproofing. The child screams all day and is in the garden from 6:30 am until 9pm at night and then continues with screaming and banging throughout the night. Should the previous owner have declared this. They have stated on the paper work that they are unaware of anything that could cause a dispute. Also how long do you have to take action
Emlar - 24-Mar-17 @ 5:42 PM
My neighbour complained about noise and raised a bat over my head. The matter has been reported to police and he is likely to be charged though he claims it didn't happen and will most likely plead not guilty. We want to sell our house in a few years. We live in Scotland. Do we need to disclose this when selling.
Joe - 23-Jul-16 @ 4:51 PM
Becks - Your Question:
When my next door neighbour first moved in I had an issue with her music and parties that she was having I approached her first and she was fine about it then the following week it happened again so I reported her to the council and spoke to her landlord since then everything has been fine do I need to pass this inform on to a potential buyer.

Our Response:
Yes you usually have to declare any neighbour disputes in your seller's information sheet. You usually have spaceto give extra details.
ProblemNeighbours - 15-Jun-16 @ 10:34 AM
When my next door neighbour first moved in I had an issue with her music and parties that she was having I approached her first and she was fine about it then the following week it happened again so I reported her to the council and spoke to her landlord since then everything has been fine do I need to pass this inform on to a potential buyer.
Becks - 13-Jun-16 @ 1:32 PM
Flo Flo - Your Question:
Hi. I live in a block of flats. Just two flats. Floor below me is rented via air bnb. Previously short term tenants. I co own freehold with first floor. Ie floor below me. First floor has at times rented to tenants who are noisy. This gone away now. Do I need to declare?Also the local council once came to inspect and observed some down lighters in their ceiling under my floor that may have breached Fire barrier. This was never finally 100% checked out. As neighbour not massively helpful to be able to do so. By council said it may possibly be an issue. This was not a definitive statement from them even. A few times the first floor flat owner. A property developer. And I have had disagreements over repairs and maintenance. Piping. My window replacements. Roof repairs. And also cleaning the stairs. We dealt with informally. But via emails. At times I had to get my solicitor involved who wrote to hers. To remind her of a few things. But always resolved in the end and without legal action as her solicitor seems to be able to get her to be amicable and reasonable.Finally when I rquested my lease extended the neigjbour refused. I had to involve my solicitor. Again as above. All eventually ok and resolved. Didn't get to court. We both extended our leases and I also agreed to freehold transfer from her mother to her. So again fine in the end. Again her solicitor encouraged some reasonable behaviour from her. So do I need to declare any or all of the above when I sell?My view on the above is that I have no ongoing issues with my neighbour at all. Sometimes it takes longer to resolve things but we always do in the end. Good sense always finally prevails. I have no issues with her tenants either. All is fine from my perspective. Legally and I'm terms of repairs and maintenance he building is in a good state and the are no ongoing or outstanding issues. Thanks. Flat owner.

Our Response:
Yes you have a duty to answer questions truthfully. There has been a number of cases where sellers have been sued for compensation after failing to give sufficient information or have provided misleading information.
ProblemNeighbours - 10-May-16 @ 2:01 PM
Hi. I live in a block of flats.Just two flats. Floor below me is rented via air bnb.Previously short term tenants. I co own freehold with first floor.Ie floor below me. First floor has at times rented to tenants who are noisy.This gone away now.Do I need to declare? Also the local council once came to inspect and observed some down lighters in their ceiling under my floor that may have breached Fire barrier. This was never finally 100% checked out. As neighbour not massively helpful to be able to do so. By council said it may possibly be an issue.This was not a definitive statement from them even. A few times the first floor flat owner.A property developer.And I have had disagreements over repairs and maintenance. Piping.My window replacements.Roof repairs.And also cleaning the stairs.We dealt with informally. But via emails.At times I had to get my solicitor involved who wrote to hers.To remind her of a few things.But always resolved in the end and without legal action as her solicitor seems to be able to get her to be amicable and reasonable. Finally when I rquested my lease extended the neigjbour refused.I had to involve my solicitor.Again as above.All eventually ok and resolved.Didn't get to court. We both extended our leases and I also agreed to freehold transfer from her mother to her. So again fine in the end.Again her solicitor encouraged some reasonable behaviour from her. So do I need to declare any or all of the above when I sell? My view on the above is that I have no ongoing issues with my neighbour at all. Sometimes it takes longer to resolve things but we always do in the end.Good sense always finally prevails.I have no issues with her tenants either. All is fine from my perspective.Legally and I'm terms of repairs and maintenance he building is in a good state and the are no ongoing or outstanding issues. Thanks. Flat owner.
Flo Flo - 8-May-16 @ 8:08 AM
I bought a house with a drive and a dropped curb. I asked the previous owners if there was any problems with parking e.g. The drive being blocked and the estate agents emailed me back "they have never had any issues". It turns out they had a scooter! So they didn't have problems. The drive was blocked regularly when I first moved in, as people didn't realise I had a car. Once it became know the neighbours stopped. I have asked for advice from pcso and council quite a few times but have never got them to come out. I have left 2 notes in 7 months (those people never blocked me again once they realised they had made it difficult) and had to speak to neighbours twice when I needed to get out and they were there. These 4 are the only times above 15 mins I have been blocked. Do I need to declare the action I have taken? I was just going to say on the form that 99% of the time the drive is fine but very occasionally it is blocked? I don't want to mislead anyone but I don't want to cause alarm where it isn't necessary Though a new neighbour moved in last weekend (one of the two I spoke too) and I sense she may do it regularly though she hasn't as of yet
Speedywolf - 22-Apr-16 @ 6:35 PM
I bought a house with a drive and a dropped curb. I asked the previous owners if there was any problems with parking e.g. The drive being blocked and the estate agents emailed me back "they have never had any issues". It turns out they had a scooter! So they didn't have problems. The drive was blocked regularly when I first moved in, as people didn't realise I had a car. Once it became know the neighbours stopped. I have asked for advice from pcso and council quite a few times but have never got them to come out. I have left 2 notes in 7 months (those people never blocked me again once they realised they had made it difficult) and had to speak to neighbours twice when I needed to get out and they were there. These 4 are the only times above 15 mins I have been blocked. Do I need to declare the action I have taken? I was just going to say on the form that 99% of the time the drive is fine but very occasionally it is blocked? I don't want to mislead anyone but I don't want to cause alarm where it isn't necessary Though a new neighbour moved in last weekend (one of the two I spoke too) and I sense she may do it regularly though she hasn't as of yet
Speedywolf - 22-Apr-16 @ 6:32 PM
I bought a house with a drive and a dropped curb. I asked the previous owners if there was any problems with parking e.g. The drive being blocked and the estate agents emailed me back "they have never had any issues". It turns out they had a scooter! So they didn't have problems. The drive was blocked regularly when I first moved in, as people didn't realise I had a car. Once it became know the neighbours stopped. I have asked for advice from pcso and council quite a few times but have never got them to come out. I have left 2 notes in 7 months (those people never blocked me again once they realised they had made it difficult) and had to speak to neighbours twice when I needed to get out and they were there. These 4 are the only times above 15 mins I have been blocked. Do I need to declare the action I have taken? I was just going to say on the form that 99% of the time the drive is fine but very occasionally it is blocked? I don't want to mislead anyone but I don't want to cause alarm where it isn't necessary Though a new neighbour moved in last weekend (one of the two I spoke too) and I sense she may do it regularly though she hasn't as of yet
Speedywolf - 22-Apr-16 @ 6:17 PM
2ndTenor - Your Question:
I will be moving out soon as I have purchased a new property and is currently being renovated. The property I currently live in is a semi detached house owned by my mother and I have lived there for the past 8 years by myself. The people who live in the house next door consist of a 19 year old male and his grandmother. Often at night the male plays loud music and occasionally has parties. He also smokes and drinks a lot and has a horrific cough. Because the property I reside is a former council property the walls are quite thin. This means I have to wear earplugs to get a decent nights sleep as I have to be up for work at around 6am. I have very little to do with them and go months at a time without speaking to them. I have always kept to myself since I've been there. I had never complained to the council or the police or even to the neighbours themselves. However, there was an incident in July last year that was rather unpleasant. The 19 year old had been left to his own devices whilst his grandmother went on holiday. Nearly 2 weeks had passed and every night during this period he was playing loud music, having parties and being generally disruptive until late. One particular evening the music was so loud that I couldn't hear my TV. I had reached boiling point. When I went to bed about 9:30-9:45pm the music was still playing. I was too intimidated to go round and complain directly so with two open palms I banged on the wall several times. This set him off. He came onto my house and banged on my window. I went outside. He was with two females in their early 20's. He was holding a metal crutch in one arm and was swearing and demanded to know why I was banging on the walls. I said I had to be up for work early and if he could please turn the music down. He said he didn't care about this and then tried to smash my window with my crutch. I got my arm in the way to block it. He then swung the crutch at my head and I blocked that too. This angered him so much he tried to hit me but was held back by the 2 females. The girls agreed to slightly turn the music down and I agreed. They walked away with no real damage done. I haven't spoken to them since and have no plans to speak to them. I didn't report the incident to the council or the police. My mum will be selling the property after I move out. Does anything need to be declared to prospective buyers?

Our Response:
This one off incident, especially as you didn't report it, would not necessarily have to be included - it does sound like a case of a young lad making the most of his grandparent being away. It would be fair to a potential buyer to mention it however.
ProblemNeighbours - 21-Apr-16 @ 12:29 PM
I will be moving out soon as I have purchased a new property and is currently being renovated. The property I currently live in is a semi detached house owned by my mother and I have lived there for the past 8 years by myself. The people who live in the house next door consist of a 19 year old male and his grandmother. Often at night the male plays loud music and occasionally has parties. He also smokes and drinks a lot and has a horrific cough. Because the property I reside is a former council property the walls are quite thin. This means I have to wear earplugs to get a decent nights sleep as I have to be up for work at around 6am. I have very little to do with them and go months at a time without speaking to them. I have always kept to myself since I've been there. I had never complained to the council or the police or even to the neighbours themselves. However, there was an incident in July last year that was rather unpleasant. The 19 year old had been left to his own devices whilst his grandmother went on holiday. Nearly 2 weeks had passed and every night during this period he was playing loud music, having parties and being generally disruptive until late. One particular evening the music was so loud that I couldn't hear my TV. I had reached boiling point. When I went to bed about 9:30-9:45pm the music was still playing. I was too intimidated to go round and complain directly so with two open palms I banged on the wall several times. This set him off. He came onto my house and banged on my window. I went outside. He was with two females in their early 20's. He was holding a metal crutch in one arm and was swearing and demanded to know why I was banging on the walls. I said I had to be up for work early and if he could please turn the music down. He said he didn't care about this and then tried to smash my window with my crutch. I got my arm in the way to block it. He then swung the crutch at my head and I blocked that too. This angered him so much he tried to hit me but was held back by the 2 females. The girls agreed to slightly turn the music down and I agreed. They walked away with no real damage done. I haven't spoken to them since and have no plans to speak to them. I didn't report the incident to the council or the police. My mum will be selling the property after I move out. Does anything need to be declared to prospective buyers?
2ndTenor - 20-Apr-16 @ 3:07 PM
whariwharangi - Your Question:
I am experiencing intermittent low frequency and infrasonic noise and or vibration in my home. I've gotten tools to conduct spectrum analysis on noise recordings. I can use the tools to triangulate have found 3 possible sources. One is machinery at a school, another is machinery at a house used as an MMAR licensed marijuana grow op, and the third is a residential property where I can find no further information without trespassing.I have made complaints to bylaw enforcement. They have not been in my home when there is nuisance and have not otherwise made any attempt at competent investigation. They have been outside my house and state they could not hear or feel anything. They don't have any tools and are relying on ears to investigate noise below hearing range of most people. I am the only person experiencing the nuisance and so they feel there no justification to investigate further. In the absence of competent bylaw enforcement. I am stuck. The only reason I want to move is because of the nuisance. Do I need to disclose the environmental noise nuisance?

Our Response:
If you sell the house it will be your repsonsibility to inform any potential buyer of your actions. If environmental health has not investigated it/found there to be no issue, then the buyer can make an informed decision based on this.
ProblemNeighbours - 18-Apr-16 @ 10:55 AM
I am experiencing intermittent low frequency and infrasonic noise and or vibration in my home. I've gotten tools to conduct spectrum analysis on noise recordings. I can use the tools to triangulatehave found 3 possible sources. One is machinery at a school, another is machinery at a house used as an MMAR licensed marijuana grow op, and the third is a residential property where I can find no further information without trespassing. I have made complaints to bylaw enforcement. They have not been in my home when there is nuisance and have not otherwise made any attempt at competent investigation. They have been outside my house and state they could not hear or feel anything. They don't have any tools and are relying on ears to investigate noise below hearing range of most people. I am the only person experiencing the nuisance and so they feel there no justification to investigate further. In the absence of competent bylaw enforcement ... I am stuck. The only reason I want to move is because of the nuisance. Do I need to disclose the environmental noise nuisance?
whariwharangi - 16-Apr-16 @ 8:33 AM
Kirst 84 - Your Question:
We have shared access way to our drive for us and 4 other houses. As per the deeds us and 2 other houses own the land and it is for access only. The children from a house that have access but no ownership play on this land with a lot of their friends. Our cars have been damaged and we've had insults hurled at as by the children. We are trying to sell our house and potential buyers have been put off by the children. What can we do! Have spoken to their parents who say they'll ask them not to play there but they still do.

Our Response:
If the parents are not succeeding in stopping this, there's not a great deal you can do except maybe to contact your local police about the insults and damage.
ProblemNeighbours - 6-Apr-16 @ 11:02 AM
We have shared access way to our drive for us and 4 other houses. As per the deeds us and 2 other houses own the land and it is for access only. The children from a house that have access but no ownership play on this land with a lot of their friends. Our cars have been damaged and we've had insults hurled at as by the children. We are trying to sell our house and potential buyers have been put off by the children. What can we do! Have spoken to their parents who say they'll ask them not to play there but they still do.
Kirst 84 - 3-Apr-16 @ 4:12 PM
JuJu - Your Question:
Can our neighbour claim (back) some of our land as his?1) Originally he owned all of the land.2) He sold to builder in 1984.3) Neighbour told us builder wrongly built our bungalow right up to boundary line on our north side.3) Neighbour, for some unknown reason, then allocated HIS front hedge (that continues from our house up to the front road) to this property, causing a staggered boundary.4) Builder sold to our predecessor in 1984.5) We bought the bungalow in 2006.So for 32 YEARS the boundary has been staggered with the long hedge 'in our favour' (as neighbours solicitor wrote it was 'in our favour'!) and we have an old letter from neighbour in early 2015 actually stating WE own the hedge (after we were wanting a reminder of who owned what tree in the back garden).Neihbour got a surveyor to measure our plot but it wasn't a detailed plan, they only showed us a measurement of the back (?) and not the front but they say this all matches with the land when he sold it to builder. He sent us a copy of that conveyance piece of paper (the only copy in existence as land registry don't have one) and this one has the land map part actually photocopied on TOP of the conveyance sheet after all the wording? But the measurements on there don't even match up with reality because if what they say applies then the line goes through our lounge! It all seems a nonsense meant to intimidate us.We had a recent 'issue' with neighbour (us questioning the missing walkway down our north side) and THEN he decided to go for ownership of the hedge (out of spite?) but surely since we bought it with the bungalow 9.5 years ago, have looked after it, have letter from HIM stating we own in AND a letter from the lady we bought it from reconfirming the staggered boundary then how/why is his solicitor sending us letters saying he is pursuing this issue after all this time out of his ownership? P.S. The land registry for us, doesn't show our property, just the plot area, BUT with a STRAIGHT line and not staggered one. We know these plans can be a bit 'out' and also the Ordnance Survey plan shows a straight line BUT with a walkway down our north side? So I guess the OS is either based on the architects plan for the bungalow (is that possible?) OR they measured it by land or air and saw walkway but then neighbour took it away?!? (That's when we asked neighbour, he said boundary was on our north wall but WHY on earth didn't he get land registry changed at the time of giving over the hedge and WHY did he let a builder build up to HIS land?We are trying to sell, hence us preparing for if prospective buyers asked why the boundary in reality didn't match with the land registry!Any words of help from you would be so appreciated. Basically our main question is can neighbour claim land that hasn't been in his possession for 32 years.Kind regards

Our Response:
It may be worth seeing a solicitor yourself with a view to either arguing this or claiming adverse possession which might be a realistic option for what you've told us.
ProblemNeighbours - 4-Mar-16 @ 2:21 PM
Can our neighbour claim (back) some of our land as his? 1) Originally he owned all of the land. 2) He sold to builder in 1984. 3) Neighbour told us builder wrongly built our bungalow right up to boundary line on our north side. 3) Neighbour, for some unknown reason, then allocated HIS front hedge (that continues from our house up to the front road) to this property, causing a staggered boundary. 4) Builder sold to our predecessor in 1984. 5) We bought the bungalow in 2006. So for 32 YEARS the boundary has been staggered with the long hedge 'in our favour' (as neighbours solicitor wrote it was 'in our favour'!) and we have an old letter from neighbour in early 2015 actually stating WE own the hedge (after we were wanting a reminder of who owned what tree in the back garden). Neihbour got a surveyor to measure our plot but it wasn't a detailed plan, they only showed us a measurement of the back (?) and not the front but they say this all matches with the land when he sold it to builder. He sent us a copy of that conveyance piece of paper (the only copy in existence as land registry don't have one) and this one has the land map part actually photocopied on TOP of the conveyance sheet after all the wording? But the measurements on there don't even match up with reality because if what they say applies then the line goes through our lounge! It all seems a nonsense meant to intimidate us... We had a recent 'issue' with neighbour (us questioning the missing walkway down our north side) and THEN he decided to go for ownership of the hedge (out of spite?) but surely since we bought it with the bungalow 9.5 years ago, have looked after it, have letter from HIM stating we own in AND a letter from the lady we bought it from reconfirming the staggered boundary then how/why is his solicitor sending us letters saying he is pursuing this issue after all this time out of his ownership? P.S. The land registry for us, doesn't show our property, just the plot area, BUT with a STRAIGHT line and not staggered one. We know these plans can be a bit 'out' and also the Ordnance Survey plan shows a straight line BUT with a walkway down our north side? So I guess the OS is either based on the architects plan for the bungalow (is that possible?) OR they measured it by land or air and saw walkway but then neighbour took it away?!? (That's when we asked neighbour, he said boundary was on our north wall but WHY on earth didn't he get land registry changed at the time of giving over the hedge and WHY did he let a builder build up to HIS land? We are trying to sell, hence us preparing for if prospective buyers asked why the boundary in reality didn't match with the land registry! Any words of help from you would be so appreciated. Basically our main question is can neighbour claim land that hasn't been in his possession for 32 years... Kind regards
JuJu - 3-Mar-16 @ 12:11 AM
Villagegirl - Your Question:
My neighbour has converted his building into flats.I oneed doing so had to provide parking they ripped down a stone wall and replaced it with a single course block wall.in doing so they have caused damage to our path which is broken up and also out concrete Base which we park our cars on.we have asked them to fix these issues but they are hostile and the council have said it is a civil matter.they did not ask our permission to take down the wall the wall cannot be found on either deeds.do they have to make this information available to prospective buyers as it looks as though we have no alternative but to go through either our insurance or legal as they we do not communicate because of past bad experiences with them

Our Response:
If the dispute has been recorded with the council, you would have to record in any seller's information you provide when selling the house. Your insurer may decide to pursue this via the neighbour's or his builders' insurance.
ProblemNeighbours - 1-Mar-16 @ 10:44 AM
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