Home > Letter Templates > Letter Template: Problem with Neighbour's Tree

Letter Template: Problem with Neighbour's Tree

By: Abigail Taylor - Updated: 4 Jan 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Neighbour Tree Letter Danger Damage

If a nearby tree looks diseased / broken or overgrown, it could cause concerns about potential damage to your property if it falls. If you have concerns, what can you do?

Have a Chat

Always try to speak to your neighbour about any problems. If this isn't possible try sending an informal note. If that doesn't resolve the issue, then a more formal letter may be required.

To assist, a template informal note and more formal letter are below:

Informal Note to Neighbour About Problem Tree

Dear [name]

Just a quick note regarding the tree at [location]. [I/we] have concerns that the tree is [diseased / has a broken branch / is overgrown] and may damage my property if it falls.If the tree belongs to you, please could you have a look at this and arrange any required pruning etc to make it safe? If not, [I/we] will do some further investigating to find the owner.

Thanks for your help.

Best wishes,
[Name] [Your house number]

Formal Letter to Neighbour About a (Potentially) Dangerous Tree

[Your Address]

[Neighbour's name]
[Address / 'Delivered by hand']
[Date]

Dear[Neighbour's name]/[If unknown, just address as 'Dear Neighbour'],

Re: Potentially dangerous tree

I live at [address], next door. I am writing in relation to concerns I have about a potential threat to health and safety posed by trees on your property.

The tree(s) that I am concerned about is/are [beech/oak/pine etc] located [describe location e.g. to the east side of your garage]. I have marked the trees on the enclosed rough sketch map so that you can clearly identify which tree(s) in particular cause me concern.

I am particularly concerned about this/these tree(s) because: [select appropriate]

  • The tree(s) is leaning to one side and appears at risk of falling
  • The tree(s) looks dead/diseased
  • The tree(s) has a large broken branch which is at risk of falling
  • The tree(s) has overgrown and is resting/encroaching on my property

The owners of trees have a legal duty of care to make sure that their trees do not pose a danger to neighbours or their property. I would therefore be grateful if you could obtain a tree survey and if this shows it is potentially dangerous, to arrange for removal or pruning of the tree.

You may have previously been unaware of the condition of the tree(s) and the potential problems caused by this. However now that this has been brought to your attention, I would request that you take action. If you do not do so, the local council potentially could take action themselves to assess and remove any trees. They may however charge any cost of doing so to you, and that is likely to cost more than if you initially carried out the work.

I am keen to resolve this amicably; we are after all neighbours! I would therefore be grateful if you could look into this matter and arrange assessment and removal or pruning of the tree(s) as a matter of urgency.

Thank you in advance for your cooperation.

Kind regards,

[Your signature]
[Your name]

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
moe - Your Question:
Concerned the offending tree belonging to the housing association has already caused damage to my boundary wall the roots have undermined it and are now protruding up in my garden. They are refusing to repair the damage caused. What can I do in this instance.

Our Response:
You can cut back any roots that intrude into your garden and can cut back any branches that are growing over the boundary line which might prevent further damage. If you want reimbursement for the cost of repairing damage already done, you might need to consider legal action or your home insurer. In general, a tree owner is only liable for damages if he/she is aware of the potential danger before it occurs.
ProblemNeighbours - 5-Jan-17 @ 9:49 AM
Concerned the offending tree belonging to the housing association has already caused damage to my boundary wall the roots have undermined it and are now protruding up in my garden. They are refusing to repair the damage caused. What can I do in this instance.
moe - 4-Jan-17 @ 12:02 AM
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice...
Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Latest Comments
Further Reading...
Our Most Popular...
Add to my Yahoo!
Add to Google
Stumble this
Add to Twitter
Add To Facebook
RSS feed
You should seek independent professional advice before acting upon any information on the ProblemNeighbours website. Please read our Disclaimer.