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Gaining Access to Neighbour's Land

By: Jeff Durham - Updated: 20 Nov 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Access Neighbour’s Land Neighbouring

If you have a good relationship with your neighbours, it’s not usually a problem for them to grant you permission to go onto their land in order that you can carry out repairs to your own property. It might be a gutter that needs replacing, and you need to get onto their side of the fence to remove the old one and replace it with a new one. Perhaps it’s a tree that is situated in your garden but which has become dangerous and unstable and it needs chopping down, yet some of the branches now hang over your neighbour’s fence. It could even be something like a drainage issue.

Ask Your Neighbour for their Permission First

A polite approach to your neighbour to ask them if you can go onto their land to resolve a problem will usually be sufficient. Sometimes they might want to ask you for more specific detail about the nature of the problem, and why you need to do the work from their side. They may be perfectly amenable to you gaining access from their side, but it might have to fit in at a time which suits them.

However, there will always be ‘awkward’ people or those who prove to be the exception to the rule and, depending on your reasons for needing to go onto their land, they might refuse permission and they may have every right to do that. In certain circumstances, you might be able to force access by taking legal action.

What The Law Says

The Access To Neighbouring Land Act 1992 can, in some instances, force a neighbour into granting you access to their land. However, the reasons needs to be justified and applicable to the law, and you must apply to the county court for an access order for which you will be charged a fee.

Justification for Granting Access to a Neighbour’s Land

When applying for an access order, you must be able to prove to the court that the repairs or any work that needs to be carried out would be necessary to preserve either a part or all of your land or property, and that either the work could not be carried out, or would be substantially hampered by the failure to be given access to your neighbour’s land.

The Importance of the Term ‘Preservation’

It’s important to be clear that an access order will only be granted in relation to the preservation, renewal or repair of any existing structure and related components of it, such as drains, pipes, cables etc, which might have become damaged, or the Removal Of Trees and other growing vegetation that might be dead, diseased, damaged or which may have become uprooted and could be deemed dangerous if not removed.

Therefore, this does not mean that you will succeed in being granted an access order if you are building an extension to your property, even if you have planning permission. Yes, certain alterations, modifications and improvements might be permissible under an access order, but only if they are incidental to the other preservation work which is carried out and it can be justified that this is necessary.

Unless relations between you and your neighbour have become so bad that they have reached a point of ‘no return’, there is rarely need for you to ever have to apply to have an access order granted. However, it is important that you understand the legal implications and the limits of the Court’s powers in this regard. This is especially relevant for any planning developments that you may be considering, where it might be highly advisable to discuss the potential for access to your neighbour’s land with your neighbour directly, if you think that might be necessary, before going ahead with any work – even if you have been granted planning permission. Understand more about your rights to access to neighbour's land here

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auntieflo - Your Question:
Our neighbours partially blocked our driveway to our house (we have a dropped kerb which we had permission for and paid for ourselves). We kindly asked them to move their car a few inches so we could get on the drive. It has caused world war 3 to break out. We have never asked them for any favours (yet, these neighbours constantly borrowed from us - when I say borrowed - they never gave our belongings back unless we badgered them over and over again). Now they are reporting us to the council for every slight little thing. Our washing machine broke and we arranged to have it collected (but, it was two weeks before it could be collected and we had nowhere to put it other than our patio). The neighbours reported us (anonymously but, we know it is them) to environmental health and said there were rats in it (completely untrue). Then they have reported us for our dogs barking. We were visited by a council officer who witnessed our two dogs wagging their tails and not even murmuring. She put on file it was a malicious report. We keep ourselves to ourselves. We have never invited neighbours in our home as we value our privacy. We don't know what they are going to report us for next. Is there anything we can do to stop this constant harassment?

Our Response:
This a civil matter and would have to be dealt with via the courts.
ProblemNeighbours - 21-Nov-17 @ 12:43 PM
Our neighbours partially blocked our driveway to our house (we have a dropped kerb which we had permission for and paid for ourselves). We kindly asked them to move their car a few inches so we could get on the drive. It has caused world war 3 to break out. We have never asked them for any favours (yet, these neighbours constantly borrowed from us - when I say borrowed - they never gave our belongings back unless we badgered them over and over again). Now they are reporting us to the council for every slight little thing. Our washing machine broke and we arranged to have it collected (but, it was two weeks before it could be collected and we had nowhere to put it other than our patio). The neighbours reported us (anonymously but, we know it is them) to environmental health and said there were rats in it (completely untrue). Then they have reported us for our dogs barking. We were visited by a council officer who witnessed our two dogs wagging their tails and not even murmuring. She put on file it was a malicious report. We keep ourselves to ourselves. We have never invited neighbours in our home as we value our privacy. We don't know what they are going to report us for next. Is there anything we can do to stop this constant harassment?
auntieflo - 20-Nov-17 @ 6:35 PM
AnnieO - Your Question:
My neighbour has an extension, built many years ago, which extends along the boundary of our gardens and our slate patio runs up to this wall. The level of the floor in the neighbours kitchen is above the level of our patio (and raised up from the level of his patio) He now has some damp in this kitchen wall and says it is because the level of our patio is higher however our patio is at the original garden level. He wants to dig down on our side of the wall to install damp proofing. He also says he wants us to create a gulley between our patio and this boundary wall. Is any of this justified? Shouldn't he solve the damp problem from his side by either installing damp proofing or by altering the height of the floor in the extension?

Our Response:
What does a surveyor say? Can the damp problem be solved from inside? You need to find out from a technical professional if you have a problem with allowing access. If the neigbour decides to pursue this, the courts may order access if the work is essential and cannot be undertaken any other way.
ProblemNeighbours - 3-Nov-17 @ 3:06 PM
My neighbour has an extension, built many years ago, which extends along the boundary of our gardens and our slate patio runs up to this wall.The level of the floor in the neighbours kitchen is above the level of our patio (and raised up from the level of his patio) He now has some damp in this kitchen wall and says it is because the level of our patio is higher however our patio is at the original garden level.He wants to dig down on our side of the wall to install damp proofing.He also says he wants us to create a gulley between our patio and this boundary wall.Is any of this justified?Shouldn't he solve the damp problem from his side by either installing damp proofing or by altering the height of the floor in the extension?
AnnieO - 3-Nov-17 @ 8:41 AM
Tasbo - Your Question:
We live in a detached house and would like to put security lights around the side (back gate access leading to rear garden/door) but in order to do this we need to put a ladder in our neighbours rear access pathway. Our neighbour has refused access (we have had issues with these neighbours in the past so we kind of expected a No) We have tried doing it without using a ladder & tried with a ladder in our own pathway but it proves impossible to reach where we need to be. Is there anything we can do in order to gain the access we require?

Our Response:
The Access to neighbouring property act is for essential maintenance and if you were to take it to court, that is what a judge would consider, so you need to decide whether you think it is essential. Can you ask someone else to "arbitrate" so you can come to some agreement with the neighbours? Bear in mind that the issue will arise whenever a bulb needs replacing etc. Is there anywhere else you can position the lights? This might be a better option.
ProblemNeighbours - 3-Oct-17 @ 12:15 PM
We live in a detached house and would like to put security lights around the side (back gate access leading to rear garden/door) but in order to do this we need to put a ladder in our neighbours rear access pathway. Our neighbour has refused access (we have had issues with these neighbours in the past so we kind of expected a No) We have tried doing it without using a ladder & tried with a ladder in our own pathway but it proves impossible to reach where we need to be. Is there anything we can do in order to gain the access we require?
Tasbo - 1-Oct-17 @ 11:27 AM
HelenM - Your Question:
My neighbour asked for access to our garden as he is building an extension. He has, however, put up scaffolding without our consent and has destroyed plants and left our garden like a rubbish tip. What can we do?

Our Response:
Write to the neighbour asking them to get the builder to reinstate the garden to its original state (even if that means buying new plants). If he refuses, tell them that you will refer it to the small claims court.
ProblemNeighbours - 18-Sep-17 @ 12:40 PM
My neighbour asked for access to our garden as he is building an extension. He has, however, put up scaffolding without our consent and has destroyed plants and left our garden like a rubbish tip. What can we do?
HelenM - 15-Sep-17 @ 10:29 PM
jonny - Your Question:
I have a party wall agreement with my neighbour who lives in the house next door (semi detached)I plan to do a rear single story extension which requires foundations digging along the boundary line between the two properties (the neighbour is refusing to allow his garden to be dug along the fence) and refusing access to his land for scaffolding) dictating that he does not want the hipped roof on my proposed extension demanding a pitched roof instead,can I enforce the party wall agreement and dig the foundations on along the boundary?can I insist that I need to build the extension according to the plans and approved planning permission and need access to his land to safely complete the works?

Our Response:
Use the party wall act to resolve a dispute about the work itself...you can read more about that HERE . In terms of the access to neighbouring land act, the purpose of this is to enable access for essential repairs/maintenance and it could be argued that an extension is not essential repairs/maintenance.Unfortunately you may have to seek the help of a mediation service to find some mutual ground that will help you progress with this. Failing that, it's the courts.
ProblemNeighbours - 10-Aug-17 @ 10:45 AM
i have a party wall agreement with my neighbour who lives in the house next door (semi detached) I plan to do a rear single story extension which requires foundations digging along the boundary line between the two properties (the neighbour is refusing to allow his garden to be dug along the fence) and refusing access to his land for scaffolding) dictating that he does not want the hipped roof on my proposed extension demanding a pitched roof instead, can i enforce the party wall agreement and dig the foundations on along the boundary? can i insist that I need to build the extension according to the plans and approved planning permission and need access to his land to safely complete the works?
jonny - 8-Aug-17 @ 11:56 PM
runner - Your Question:
We are seeking an Access Order under the Access to Neighbouring Land ActThis is our only option as our neighbour is totally unreasonable. Our solicitor is dealing with this.My question is what happens when (not if) even with the access order our neighbour refuses permission. I know he will be in contempt of court so will he be arrested? The work will take five days. Will he be rearrested each day or will he be locked up for the duration. If he is let out when the builders have gone home for the day he will very likely try to dismantle the scaffolding. How will the police or court deal with this? As you can appreciate we have really serious problems with neighbour.

Our Response:
The legislation states the following:
"If any person contravenes or fails to comply with any requirement, term or condition imposed upon him by or under this Act, the court may, without prejudice to any other remedy available, make an order for the payment of damages by him to any other person affected by the contravention or failure who makes an application for relief under this subsection"
ProblemNeighbours - 8-Aug-17 @ 10:39 AM
We are seeking an Access Order under the Access to Neighbouring Land Act This is our only option as our neighbour is totally unreasonable. Our solicitor is dealing with this. My question is what happens when (not if) even with the access order our neighbour refuses permission. I know he will be in contempt of court so will he be arrested? The work will take five days. Will he be rearrested each day or will he be locked up for the duration. If he is let out when the builders have gone home for the day he will very likely try to dismantle the scaffolding. How will the police or court deal with this? As you can appreciate we have really serious problems with neighbour.
runner - 5-Aug-17 @ 12:30 PM
CN - Your Question:
The property that backs onto the bottom of my garden has a row of very tall trees on their side (around 20-25 metres in height). The branches are overhanging into my garden by up to 3 metres.The neighbour does not agree to me cutting back the overhanging branches.Whilst I know that I am allowed to cut away any overhanging branches, I am unsure how I stand on access to their property in order to do this.I have had several tree surgeons round to look at the work & all have said they would need access to the trees trunks (in the neighbour's garden) in order to climb the trees & cut down the overhanging branches.The neighbour has said that if this is done, they will call the police on the grounds of the tree surgeon trespassing.Do you know if this would in fact be classed as trespassing, as there is no other way the job can be done, and it would only be in order to climb the trees & remove the overhanging branches, nothing else.Thanks in advance.

Our Response:
You do need permission from the tree owner if you want to access their garden. You could try a civil action via the courts especially if the trees are causing a nuisance. Also if the trees are evergreen you could try the high hedges legislation
ProblemNeighbours - 3-Jul-17 @ 2:09 PM
The property that backs onto the bottom of my garden has a row of very tall trees on their side (around 20-25 metres in height). The branches are overhanging into my garden by up to 3 metres. The neighbour does not agree to me cutting back the overhanging branches. Whilst I know that I am allowed to cut away any overhanging branches, I am unsure how I stand on access to their property in order to do this. I have had several tree surgeons round to look at the work & all have said they would need access to the trees trunks (in the neighbour's garden) in order to climb the trees & cut down the overhanging branches. The neighbour has said that if this is done, they will call the police on the grounds of the tree surgeon trespassing. Do you know if this would in fact be classed as trespassing, as there is no other way the job can be done, and it would only be in order to climb the trees & remove the overhanging branches, nothing else. Thanks in advance.
CN - 2-Jul-17 @ 10:55 AM
Hi, I own a property that is rented out, and on my last inspection I noticed bad damp that needs fixing, which I need to do under the law of my contract. It is a semi-detached house and the builder need to fix the damp from the outside, which requires scaffolding going across the neighbours roof. No access is needed as it can be done from my side; but the neighbours are refusing the scaffolding to touch their roof. The damp cannot be fixed without it. Will I need to offer compensation?
EmmaEPD14 - 13-May-17 @ 9:36 AM
bassett - Your Question:
We are in a detached property with a passageway along the side - all that land belongs to us. In that land there is a narrow soil drain from our bathroom. The neighbours a semi on one side are building an extension. Initially the neighbours served a party wall notice, but decided not to go ahead as they weren't actually building foundations under our land, only on their land and it was too expensive.Building has started, and the builder dug away about 18 inches of our land all along the boundary leaving our higher earth level with a ditch down the side - I hope they fill it in. Now the builders haven't asked us and have started stacking great hods of bricks all over our side way without asking. Its not a passageway we use much, but still its our land they've dug away without permission and parked their brick on it. I'm worried about damage to our shallow drains with the weight of the bricks on it. My husband is just about to have hip operation and it would be disasterous for us if he can't use downstairs loo after discharge. They're also so close to our bathroom/toilet window during the day standing on our land to build and move the bricks that we don't feel we can use downstairs bathroom even with clouded window. They are right outside at times. What can we do? The neighbours are ok but out all day, but their builders are taking more and more liberties with our land.

Our Response:
Speak to the neighbours first of all. Make sure they know that the builders are on your land without permission and that you are worried about the strength of the drains etc. If they don't stop, or do not offer you any reassurances, you might need a solicitor's letter. If you're happy that they're aware of the situation and their insurance will be should any damage occur, you could just simply leave it at that and hope it's over with soon.
ProblemNeighbours - 30-Mar-17 @ 2:42 PM
We are in a detached property with a passageway along the side - all that land belongs to us. In that land there is a narrow soil drain from our bathroom. The neighbours a semi on one side are building an extension. Initially the neighbours served a party wall notice, but decided not to go ahead as they weren't actually building foundations under our land, only on their land and it was too expensive. Building has started, and the builder dug away about 18 inches of our land all along the boundary leaving our higher earth level with a ditch down the side - I hope they fill it in.Now the builders haven't asked us and have started stacking great hods of bricks all over our side way without asking.Its not a passageway we use much, but still its our land they've dug away without permission and parked their brick on it.I'm worried about damage to our shallow drains with the weight of the bricks on it.My husband is just about to have hip operation and it would be disasterous for us if he can't use downstairs loo after discharge.They're also so close to our bathroom/toilet window during the day standing on our land to build and move the bricks that we don't feel we can use downstairs bathroom even with clouded window.They are right outside at times.What can we do?The neighbours are ok but out all day, but their builders are taking more and more liberties with our land.
bassett - 29-Mar-17 @ 8:04 PM
Moody - Your Question:
I own a detached property and we have fence which is fixed to both my wall and my neighbours wall at the front of my house. My neighbour wants to rep,ace the fence with a gate and I don't want that. Where do I stand and what can I do?

Our Response:
There really isn't enough information to comment on this effectively. Who owns the fence? Why would a gate be needed etc? Is there any information on the title deeds?
ProblemNeighbours - 22-Mar-17 @ 11:40 AM
I own a detached property and we have fence which is fixed to both my wall and my neighbours wall at the front of my house. My neighbour wants to rep,ace the fence with a gate and I don't want that. Where do I stand and what can I do?
Moody - 19-Mar-17 @ 3:07 PM
Beasley - Your Question:
We have an end of terrace house, we have permitted development to do a loft conversation, in order to do so we need to put wrap around scaffolding on our property the end of our wall is at the foot of our neighbours garden so is classed as a boundary wall, the neighbours are refusing us permission to put the scaffolding as it will hang over there side. Is there anything we can do?

Our Response:
You could try mediation if they're already refusing. Alternatively an application to the courts might work but the above act is for essential maintenance so there's no guarantee of a court order being granted. Sorry we couldn't offer anything more positive. Speak to your builder, there may be an alternative means of carrying out the work.
ProblemNeighbours - 16-Mar-17 @ 11:38 AM
We have an end of terrace house, we have permitted development to do a loft conversation, in order to do so we need to put wrap around scaffolding on our property the end of our wall is at the foot of our neighbours garden so is classed as a boundary wall, the neighbours are refusing us permission to put the scaffolding as it will hang over there side. Is there anything we can do?
Beasley - 14-Mar-17 @ 12:51 PM
billy - Your Question:
I need to put scaffolding up to repaired my roof scaffolding needs to just have one side in there property for about a week.they have refused. what can I do about this. it is the only way to do it

Our Response:
If this in the only means of carrying out an essential repair and the neighbours are refusing, you may have to apply for a court order under the above act. Send a polite letter to your neighbours asking again for permssion and agreeing to rectify any damage. Include the fact that you may have to apply to the courts if they do not agree, but that of course you would rather avoid doing so.
ProblemNeighbours - 9-Feb-17 @ 10:31 AM
I need to put scaffolding up to repaired my roof scaffolding needs to just have one side in there property for about a week.they have refused. what can I do about this. it is the only way to do it
billy - 7-Feb-17 @ 2:02 PM
actsofkind - Your Question:
Hi, I have been served with a party structure notice on a home I am 6 months into a 2 year contract on ( rented). Prior to this the neighbour above who plans to build a two story addition came to see us and told us everything we wanted to hear. The scaffolding would only be up 3 weeks, we could choose times of work ( keeping in mind my partner works night shift) and when this would happen. This same night all this detail changes and he was not able to guarantee anything as essentially he had lied to us. The owner or landlord of my property knew about his planned works prior to us signing our tenancy agreement and did not disclose this to us. Essentially being in breach of contract.We had asked for no works on weekends, a finish date that can be gauranteed or a deferal as we have guest over our wedding during their planned building period as well as compensation for use and access to our land - we pay expensive london rents and I am not happy to not have any compensation when I will essentially be living on a building site for 3 months. The neighbours are moving away for this time - leaving us to deal with the mess, disturbance and inconvenience all for their financila gain and benefit.What legal stading do I have with this- should I get a lawyer involved? I will get a surveyor to represent around the Party wall but I do not want to live in this mess with them having no consideration for us.Please help

Our Response:
If terms were agreed with you and they have not been adhered to, then it's a legal issue and you may have to take court action to ensure the conditions are met and to be compensated for any damage and/or incovenience.
ProblemNeighbours - 8-Dec-16 @ 11:54 AM
I built a room in the roof of my existing garage. The new roof has a flat side that is cladded. It backs onto my neighbours garden. The builders have left about two panels off the bottom of the side cladding as the neighbours wont let them in to the garden add the last bit of cladding. They can't reach any lower with the suspended scaffolding. I'm worried the building inspector won't pass it and I've heard court orders won't help as this is classed as extention. If over the years the side gets wet and rots it will cause structural damage. What can I do?
Peppa - 8-Dec-16 @ 11:28 AM
Hi, I have been served with a party structure notice on a home i am 6 months into a 2 year contract on ( rented). Prior to this the neighbour above who plans to build a two story addition came to see us and told us everything we wanted to hear. The scaffolding would only be up 3 weeks, we could choose times of work ( keeping in mind my partner works night shift) and when this would happen. This same night all this detail changes and he was not able to guarantee anything as essentially he had lied to us. The owner or landlord of my property knew about his planned works prior to us signing our tenancy agreement and did not disclose this to us. Essentially being in breach of contract. We had asked for no works on weekends, a finish date that can be gauranteed or a deferal as we have guest over our wedding during their planned building period as well as compensation for use and access to our land - we pay expensive london rents and I am not happy to not have any compensation when I will essentially be living on a building site for 3 months. The neighbours are moving away for this time - leaving us to deal with the mess, disturbance and inconvenience all for their financila gain and benefit. What legal stading do I have with this- should I get a lawyer involved? I will get a surveyor to represent around the Party wall but I do not want to live in this mess with them having no consideration for us. Please help
actsofkind - 5-Dec-16 @ 2:12 PM
Cee- Your Question:
My property is owed by a social housing landlord and the tenant I am in dispute with owns his own property (the entire house).In November 2015, he came to my home to inform me that he had purchased the property to the back of my garden and that our party wall was crumbling on his side. He said that he needed to destroy the wall and erect a new one. I informed him that would be fine by me but I wanted my garden murders decorations preserved and he would need to contact my landlord to obtain permission in the first instance. In March he unexpectedly entered my garden and commenced to block off half of my garden to apparently start work. I told him that I was not happy about my garden being blocked off but he gave the strong impression that it was being done to preserve my privacy and reduce dust in my hone, he also said the work would take 2weeks. In fact, I had no access to my garden for 6 months, and worse still he hadn't even contacted my landlord. My garden and home was filled with building work material, dust, debris and cigarette butts/phlegm from his builders.I asked him.on several occasions to stop work in my garden area and he responded by erecting scaffolding.I had a planned function in my garden which I had to relocate because he refused to remove his scaffolding from my blocked off garden. Everyday it got from bad to worse.It is now coming to the end of November, the wall is erected, the scaffolding is down but the owner (who does on hands work with his contract), remains to do wanderer he likes in my garden. I have contacted my landlord on numerous occasions to intervene and the most they did was to appoint a private party wall surveyor who concluded that the new owner was trespassing on my landlord land. The surveyor was also concerned that the extension carried out impinged on the party wall that might belong to my property. The surveyor asked my landlord for the deeds to the land and for my landlord to serve the new owner for trespassing but nothing has ever been done and the surveyor has been ignored. Is there anything that I can do to stop this new owner from defacing my personal belongings? My garden now looks a total.mess and he has damaged my daughter's trampoline beyond use. My husband is washing down our garden twice weekly due to the dust and dirt and my kitchen/conservatory curtains ate absolutely filthy I wish to claim compensation for all the stress and inconvenience that awful owner has put my family and I through. Will.i be able to do so and if so, how much can I claim?

Our Response:
You will need to seek legal advice about whether such a claim would be successful. To work out how much to claim, assess the amount of inconvience/extra work you've been through and also the actual cost of any damage to your property.
ProblemNeighbours - 23-Nov-16 @ 12:36 PM
Tiatam - Your Question:
Hi I have an end terrace and my neighbours garden backs onto the side of my house. They put up a garden shed and was very pretty but now the bad weather has come and to our horror when it rains the water runs off the roof of the shed and soaks into our wall which in turn has came through into my interior wall. The shed has no guttering or anything on the roof so the side of the roof is flush with my wall. I've had to remove the wallpaper in my hall and we desperately trying to dry it out before the plaster crumbles what is the law regarding this as if we need to do any re pointing we can't at that part of the wall as the shed is there. There is no gap between the roof and our wall. Can we insist it is removed or at least moved over and by about how much?

Our Response:
Speak to your home insurer for advice on this, they should be able to tell you whether you can claim from your neighbour.
ProblemNeighbours - 23-Nov-16 @ 11:31 AM
My property is owed by a social housing landlord and the tenant I am in dispute with owns his own property (the entire house). In November 2015, he came to my home to inform me that he had purchased the property to the back of my garden and that our party wall was crumbling on his side. He said that he needed to destroy the wall and erect a new one. I informed him that would be fine by me but I wanted my garden murders decorations preserved and he would need to contact my landlord to obtain permission in the first instance. In March he unexpectedly entered my garden and commenced to block off half of my garden to apparently start work. I told him that I was not happy about my garden being blocked off but he gave the strong impression that it was being done to preserve my privacy and reduce dust in my hone, he also said the work would take 2weeks. In fact, I had no access to my garden for 6 months, and worse still he hadn't even contacted my landlord. My garden and home was filled with building work material, dust, debris and cigarette butts/phlegm from his builders. I asked him.on several occasions to stop work in my garden area and he responded by erecting scaffolding. I had a planned function in my garden which I had to relocate because he refused to remove his scaffolding from my blocked off garden. Everyday it got from bad to worse. It is now coming to the end of November, the wall is erected, the scaffolding is down but the owner (who does on hands work with his contract), remains to do wanderer he likes in my garden. I have contacted my landlord on numerous occasions to intervene and the most they did was to appoint a private party wall surveyor who concluded that the new owner was trespassing on my landlord land. The surveyor was also concerned that the extension carried out impinged on theparty wall that might belong to my property.The surveyor asked my landlord for the deeds to the land and for my landlord to serve the new owner for trespassing but nothing has ever been done and the surveyor has been ignored. Is there anything that I can do to stop this new owner from defacing my personal belongings? My garden now looks a total.mess and he has damaged my daughter's trampoline beyond use. My husband is washing down our garden twice weekly due to the dust and dirt and my kitchen/conservatory curtains ate absolutely filthy I wish to claim compensation for all the stress and inconvenience that awful owner has put my family and I through. Will.i be able to do so and if so, how much can I claim?
Cee - 23-Nov-16 @ 5:31 AM
Hi I have an end terrace and my neighbours garden backs onto the side of my house. They put up a garden shed and was very pretty but now the bad weather has come and to our horror when it rains the water runs off the roof of the shed and soaks into our wall which in turn has came through into my interior wall. The shed has no guttering or anything on the roof so the side of the roof is flush with my wall. I've had to remove the wallpaper in my hall and we desperately trying to dry it out before the plaster crumbles what is the law regarding this as if we need to do any re pointing we can't at that part of the wall as the shed is there. There is no gap between the roof and our wall. Can we insist it is removed or at least moved over and by about how much?
Tiatam - 22-Nov-16 @ 8:46 PM
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