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Unhappy With a Neighbour's High Hedge?

By: Abigail Taylor - Updated: 15 May 2018 | comments*Discuss
 
Hedge Height Neighbour Council Complain

What can you do if you are unhappy with a neighbour's hedge?

"The farmer with land opposite our property... has let the hedge opposite us grow well over 6ft and it's untidily restricting our view. What can we do?"

Trim any overhanging branches - Any parts of the hedge that protrude onto your land, you may trim back to the point at which they cross the boundary. (Note: This does not mean that you can trim the height of the hedge, just the overhanging branches / foliage. You must also do this from your own property unless your neighbour gives you permission to use their land for access.)

Speak to your neighbour about the problem - It may be that they do not realise how it affects your property, or that you can come to some compromise about the hedge height.

Use the Antisocial Behaviour Act - If you have spoken to your neighbour and you are unable to solve the problem, you can ask your local council to intervene using their powers under Part 8 of the Antisocial Behaviour Act 2003. This should only be used as a last resort and the council can refuse to intervene if they do not consider that you have done all you can to informally resolve the dispute first.

Complaining to your local council

If you would like your local council to investigate your complaint the hedge in question must meet the following criteria:
  • Be rooted on land belonging to someone else
  • Be made up of a minimum of 2 or more trees or shrubs
  • Be mostly made up of evergreen or semi-evergreen trees or shrubs
  • Be more than 2 metres tall
  • Be capable of obstructing light or views

You can complain to your local council if you are the owner or occupier (e.g. landlord, tenant or resident owner) of the affected property. The property affected must however be residential (i.e. not a business or warehouse).

When considering whether a hedge height detracts from the reasonable enjoyment of your property or garden, the council will consider all relevant factors, including light, views and the home owner's need for privacy.

Note: Be aware that most councils charge a fee to investigate your complaint. This can be up to £650, though the average charge is around £300. People with lower incomes will generally be eligible for a discount.

Further information on complaining to the council about high hedges can be found in this document on the government website

Remedial Notices

If the council considers that the hedge is too high, they may impose a remedial notice. This requires the hedge owner to remedy the problem and prevent it reoccurring.

Key facts about remedial notices:

  • A remedial notice is likely to include a long-term provision to prevent the problem reoccurring (for example a requirement to annually trim the hedge to prevent it growing over a certain height).
  • A remedial notice cannot require a hedge to be cut lower than 2 metres or removed entirely.
  • A remedial notice is both binding on the current hedge owner or occupier of the premises, and any future successor owners or occupiers.
  • A remedial notice will be registered as a local land charge against your property (in the same way as any other restriction such as a right of way or easement).
  • A remedial notice can be relaxed or waived at a later date by the local council. However both the complainant and the owner/occupier of the land containing the hedge will be notified if this is proposed by the council.

A remedial notice can be appealed. All appeals are dealt with by the Planning Inspectorate. There is no fee for appealing a remedial notice, but parties have to bear their own costs (for example any legal fees if you wish to get help from a solicitor).

Enforcement

If the owner/occupier fails to comply with a remedial notice, then can be fined up to £1000. The council can, in addition to the fine also require compliance with the notice within a specified time period.

Failure to comply within that period could lead to a further fine of up to £1000, plus a daily fine of up to £200 for every day that the notice is not complied with.

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[Add a Comment]
Mark - Your Question:
We have scrubs over there 6ft fence in our garden the neighbore has threatened us with legal matters if we don't cut it down to the 6ft fence hight were we stand with it in the eyes of the law there 3 shrubs and one bloosems if that makes a different and not evergreen regards

Our Response:
There are no laws about the height of shrubs. If the fence belongs to your neighbour however, you must not let your shrubs grow against it; make sure they are free standing or grow against a self supported trellis. If any branches grow over your neighbour's airspace, they can cut them back as far as the boundary.
ProblemNeighbours - 16-May-18 @ 11:22 AM
We have scrubs over there 6ft fence in our garden the neighbore has threatened us with legal matters if we don't cut it down to the 6ft fence hight were we stand with it in the eyes of the law there 3 shrubs and one bloosems if that makes a different and not evergreen regards
Mark - 14-May-18 @ 7:53 PM
Chuckyjimbo - Your Question:
Hi I bought a new build house with an 8m south facing garden. Our rear neighbour has a 5m high row of tress that blocks out all our light in the garden. If we raise a dispute will it matter that the house was built with the trees/hedge in-situ. Outside of this point we believe we have a case for requesting it be reduced to a more reasonable height to give better light.

Our Response:
The simple answer is to try...first of all, talk to the neighbour and ask if they will reduce the height of the trees. If they refuse, the above legislation may help.
ProblemNeighbours - 11-May-18 @ 2:10 PM
Jam donut - Your Question:
Hi my neighbour at the back of me has eight leylandii and 14 feet high.He makes one excuse after another why he hasn't had it cut.Just lies to me.It's like he's doing this to wind me up. He is about late 70s and he comes across A bit rude to talk to. When I knock his door. I am very polite when I talk to him. I get the impression his letting it grow to annoy his neighbour. I could be wrong as it maybe a money issue as its expensive getting the hedge cut. I have offered him money to help in the past but he says no it's ok they are my responsibility and I will sort them. But he fails to get it cut annually and makes excuses up.Does anyone know what this problem is about as its doing my head in looking at a giant green wall everyday. I could get the council involved but it's not blocking light into my house yet but it's a very high hedge for such a built up culdasac.

Our Response:
Check the details in the above article, it's not just daylight that is considered with cases dealt with under high hedges legislation. We have no idea why your neighbour is reluctant to get the work done.
ProblemNeighbours - 11-May-18 @ 1:51 PM
Hi I bought a new build house with an 8m south facing garden. Our rear neighbour has a 5m high row of tress that blocks out all our light in the garden. If we raise a dispute will it matter that the house was built with the trees/hedge in-situ. Outside of this point we believe we have a case for requesting it be reduced to a more reasonable height to give better light.
Chuckyjimbo - 10-May-18 @ 12:00 PM
Hi my neighbour at the back of me has eight leylandii and 14 feet high. He makes one excuse after another why he hasn't had it cut. Just lies to me. It's like he's doing this to wind me up . He is about late 70s and he comes across A bit rude to talk to. When I knock his door. I am very polite when I talk to him. I get the impression his letting it grow to annoy his neighbour. I could be wrong as it maybe a money issue as its expensive getting the hedge cut. I have offered him money to help in the past but he says no it's ok they are my responsibility and I will sort them. But he fails to get it cut annually and makes excuses up. Does anyone know what this problem is about as its doing my head in looking at a giant green wall everyday. I could get the council involved but it's not blocking light into my house yet but it's a very high hedge for such a built up culdasac.
Jam donut - 9-May-18 @ 11:41 PM
Rex - Your Question:
We had an array of shrubs grown over 40 years which used to act as the boundary - I have been living in the house for almost 3 years and have always maintained the shrubs. My neighbour decided to uproot them without asking us with some contractors while she is away on holidays. She now has claimed a part of the land which is clearly not a straight line as we have 2 more gardens backing off to us before this neighbour's garden start from the back. The neighbour is really not considerate and always try to move the boundary line as she wishes and she says she is responsible for that side of the boundary. What should I do. Should I contact the council? Is my only way is to go via a civil court?

Our Response:
The council will not be able to do anyting her unless it's council property. Yes the civil courts are probably your best course of action.
ProblemNeighbours - 9-May-18 @ 3:27 PM
We had an array of shrubs grown over 40 years which used to act as the boundary - I have been living in the house for almost 3 years and have always maintained the shrubs. My neighbour decided to uproot them without asking us with some contractors while she is away on holidays. She now has claimed a part of the land which is clearly not a straight line as we have 2 more gardens backing off to us before this neighbour's garden start from the back. The neighbour is really not considerate and always try to move the boundary line as she wishes and she says she is responsible for that side of the boundary. What should I do. Should I contact the council? Is my only way is to go via a civil court?
Rex - 9-May-18 @ 10:09 AM
Our there is a hedge between us and the neighbour says its his now half is dead but still stood and the other is pushing 3.2 meters as i say he says the hedge is his but when i look down the line of the front wll to the cavity of the houses it looks like its on the boundary .now we have a dog and we would like it to have roam in our garden when we are outside so i would lile to build a wall on our property but his hedge is overhanging and i dare say some of it has grown on our side i would say its about 50 years old privit how do i go about solving this we have had a asbo on the chap in the past so he is beyond talking to
Army - 1-Apr-18 @ 7:44 AM
Lopper - Your Question:
Bought my property a few years ago.Neighbour at the back of me has 8 Leyland trees and 14 feet high.He fobs me off when I ask him to get it cut. He let it grow for 3 years and only then got it 2feet cut off the top and told me he couldn't have anymore off which is total rubbish. I have a six foot fence and then a wall of conifers to look at everyday 7-8 feet high on top.It's driving me insane and I can only think why he is doing for the reason to be nasty. It does not block the light coming into my house but it is very overpowering in my small garden. There is. No need for it to be that high. None of the other neighbours have hedges they are looked after and consider their neighbours but I guess I'm the unlucky one with a inconsiderate neighbour.

Our Response:
If you use the above legislation to complain that the hedge detracts from the reasonable enjoyment of your property or garden, the council will consider all relevant factors, including light, views and the need for privacy.
ProblemNeighbours - 28-Mar-18 @ 2:30 PM
Bought my property a few years ago. Neighbour at the back of me has 8 Leyland trees and 14 feet high. He fobs me off when I ask him to get it cut . He let it grow for 3 years and only then got it 2feet cut off the top and told me he couldn't have anymore off which is total rubbish.I have a six foot fence and then a wall of conifers to look at everyday 7-8 feet high on top. It's driving me insane and I can only think why he is doing for the reason to be nasty. It does not block the light coming into my house but it is very overpowering in my small garden. There is. No need for it to be that high . None of the other neighbours have hedges they are looked after and consider their neighbours but I guess I'm the unlucky one with a inconsiderate neighbour.
Lopper - 26-Mar-18 @ 10:57 PM
Leesa - Your Question:
I am moving into a grade 2 listed house that has only a front garden (large). There are two other houses that face the side of my garden which leads directly on to the road. At the moment, this is an open plan garden, with no fence or hedging to mark the boundary. As this will be my only garden, I want to plant a hedgerow (just a meter or so high) to outline the entire garden and allow me some privacy. The hedgerow will run, on one side, along the front of their houses. Do I have to ensure that it sits below their windows so that they receive the same amount of light into their homes as they always have? The garden is not listed, only the house and the land registry records clearly show the entire garden as belonging only to my house.

Our Response:
If you keep the hedge to a reasonable height this should be fine. In general a neighbour can pursue an action of the hedge is a significant barrier to light or access and rises to a height of more than two metres above ground level.It might be worth a call to your planning authority to make sure there are not locally imposed conditions on hedges/fences in your area (your deeds might also make mention of this).
ProblemNeighbours - 23-Mar-18 @ 11:51 AM
I am moving into a grade 2 listed house that has only a front garden (large). There are two other houses that face the side of my garden which leads directly on to the road.At the moment, this is an open plan garden, with no fence or hedging to mark the boundary.As this will be my only garden, I want to plant a hedgerow (just a meter or so high) to outline the entire garden and allow me some privacy.The hedgerow will run, on one side, along the front of their houses.Do I have to ensure that it sits below their windows so that they receive the same amount of light into their homes as they always have?The garden is not listed, only the house and the land registry records clearly show the entire garden as belonging only to my house.
Leesa - 20-Mar-18 @ 4:02 PM
marianne - Your Question:
For years we have had problems with neighbours hedge. This he allows to overgrow so our exit view (by car) is obstructed. Last year-after several calls to local authority he finally cut it. However, he also has piled up clay (on which a variety of weeds now grow) and which also attracts vermin. It also affects view from our window.This is entrance to a far. There is no point in trying to talk to said farmer. Despite several complaints to council and health authorities nothing has been done. Advice appreciated.

Our Response:
There really isn't much you can do about the piled up soil/clay and weeds - but if there is no food there, it's no more likely to attract vermin than a field, wildlife meadow or even garden. Farms do attract mice and even rats unfortunately. If the hedge grows over the road or pavement, the farmer has to cut it back and as you know, the council will follow this up for you if you raise a complaint.
ProblemNeighbours - 14-Feb-18 @ 9:55 AM
For years we have had problems with neighbours hedge. This he allows to overgrow so our exit view (by car) is obstructed. Last year-after several calls to local authority he finally cut it. However, he also has piled up clay (on which a variety of weeds now grow) and which also attracts vermin. It also affects view from our window. This is entrance to a far. There is no point in trying to talk to said farmer. Despite several complaints to council and health authorities nothing has been done. Advice appreciated.
marianne - 12-Feb-18 @ 3:07 PM
Marco - Your Question:
We bought a new-build property and out neighbours moved in to their property six months later after their completion date.They planted conifers in their front lawn along the front to border on the pavement and also to the left-side, bordering on our 9ft wide driveway, only 10cm away from our border.These conifers have started to 'take root' and are now nearing 3ft diameter, which is encroaching onto my driveway by nearly 18", thus reducing my driveway width and ease of getting in and out of my car.What rights do I have to cut these conifers back? If I have to trim them back, they would then be like 'semi-circle conifers' which will be green on the neighbours side and bare branches on my side.I bought this house with a 9ft driveway and intend it to stay that way.

Our Response:
You can cut them back to the boundary. It's probably best to discuss this with your neighbour, they may agree to remove them or allow you to do as you say and render them bare on your side etc.
ProblemNeighbours - 29-Jan-18 @ 2:04 PM
We bought a new-build property and out neighbours moved in to their property six months later after their completion date. They planted conifers in their front lawn along the front to border on the pavement and also to the left-side, bordering on our 9ft wide driveway, only 10cm away from our border. These conifers have started to 'take root' and are now nearing 3ft diameter, which is encroaching onto my driveway by nearly 18", thus reducing my driveway width and ease of getting in and out of my car. What rights do I have to cut these conifers back?If I have to trim them back, they would then be like 'semi-circle conifers' which will be green on the neighbours side and bare branches on my side. I bought this house with a 9ft driveway and intend it to stay that way.
Marco - 27-Jan-18 @ 11:37 AM
Our neighbourhas planted laurels about 3 inchesfrom our fence, and they are pushing it over, can we do any thing about it?considering how strong they will grow.
Bushel - 20-Jan-18 @ 12:31 PM
ponytail - Your Question:
I have new neighbours who have decided to make our lives here a misery. We bought this rural plot 8 years ago for the sea view, a selling point if whenever we sell. Last year we got new vulgar neighbours. You wouldn't think they could be a problem as house is to the left app 100m away. Their land spreads along in front of ours with a public footpath running between. It used to have horses on etc. They have decided to randomly plant of all trees sycamores and leyland. This is in response to loosing a boundary dispute right in front of our property. An old sycamore hedge which we prune to keep our view but thickens to keep our privacy and theirs. A nice hedge in summer totally see through in winter. They were trying to prevent us pruning it each year and lost. Out of spite 5 sycamores or more have been planted on their side of the boundary which we cannot touch and will in years to come ruin the view. It is not garden its fields and looking at what they plant and how shows they have no idea on gardening. They will not talk to us and their seems to be no rules to prevent us keeping the view. I don't understand why they bought it if they are privacy mad as the footpath runs through their property. I think it may come under antisocial behaviour act but the council have been no help at all despite all the restrictions on our new build height etc.

Our Response:
Unfortunately there is nothing you can do really...it's a generally accepted priniciple a land owner cannot protect the view that he has from that land. You could check your deeds to see if anything relates to covenants which apply to you and nearby neighbours which could possibly used in a court.
ProblemNeighbours - 15-Nov-17 @ 12:21 PM
I have new neighbours who have decided to make our lives here a misery. We bought this rural plot 8 years ago for the sea view, a selling point if whenever we sell. Last year we got new vulgar neighbours. You wouldn't think they could be a problem as house is to the left app 100m away. Their land spreads along in front of ours with a public footpath running between. It used to have horses on etc. They have decided to randomly plant of all trees sycamores and leyland. This is in response to loosing a boundary dispute right in front of our property. An old sycamore hedge which we prune to keep our view but thickens to keep our privacy and theirs. A nice hedge in summer totally see through in winter.They were trying to prevent us pruning it each year and lost. Out of spite 5 sycamores or more have been planted on their side of the boundary which we cannot touch and will in years to come ruin the view. It is not garden its fields and looking at what they plant and how shows they have no idea on gardening. They will not talk to us and their seems to be no rules to prevent us keeping the view. I don't understand why they bought it if they are privacy mad as the footpath runs through their property. I think it may come under antisocial behaviour act but the council have been no help at all despite all the restrictions on our new build height etc.
ponytail - 14-Nov-17 @ 11:30 AM
Harvey - Your Question:
Hello there, my neighbour asked for us to cut our hedge to 2m or he would file a dispute. We didn't want to cut it this low so offered to trim it by 2ft between Oct and Christmas. We have carried out the work already (Oct) actually taking 5ft off (took photos) After sending a letter (Neighbour doesn't actually live at the property - it is empty but is a registered business address for his two businesses and we have no other means of contacting him) to request permission to enter his garden to retrieve any lose bits that fall his side. He replied by letter wanting to know when we were going to carry out the work. Unfortunately we received this letter on a Wednesday and we planned to complete the work on the Sat. We went round to our neighbours on the Thurs and Fri evenings trying to inform them but the property was unoccupied. On the Sat we cut the trees ensuring that as much as possible, nothing went their side but inevitably a few bits did. We then sent a letter explaining that we had tried to inform them but they weren't there and we were obviously not going to trespass. Now the following Tues we receive a letter explainig that he was there all day on the Sat asking why didn't we go round. I have been round to ask why he didn't let us know that he was there, either by knocking on our front door or by coming out into his garden and then we would have gone through and finished off / tidied up. I am really cross because we have taken reasonable steps to resolve this amicably between us and had he made us aware of his presence on Saturday we would have gone into his garden to clear up as stated in our previous letter. My husband and I work and are unable to now go his side to clear up. He is also requesting that we trim the hedge his side when he has always maintained it for the past 9 years. Do we legally have to go and pick up the stray bits fallen his side (even though we would have done had we of known he was there) and do we have to maintain the hedge his side? Many thanks.

Our Response:
If it's not your hedge, you are under no obligation to maintain it. As the neighbour has allowed you to reduce the height of the hedge, you should probably remove any clippings too. If the neighbour makes it dificult for you to enter his property, it would be unreasonable if he then took action to get you to remove the clippings.
ProblemNeighbours - 11-Oct-17 @ 1:01 PM
Hello there, my neighbour asked for us to cut our hedge to 2m or he would file a dispute. We didn't want to cut it this low so offered to trim it by 2ft between Oct and Christmas. We have carried out the work already (Oct) actually taking 5ft off (took photos) After sending a letter (Neighbour doesn't actually live at the property - it is empty but is a registered business address for his two businesses and we have no other means of contacting him) to request permission to enter his garden to retrieve any lose bits that fall his side. He replied by letter wanting to know when we were going to carry out the work. Unfortunately we received this letter on a Wednesday and we planned to complete the work on the Sat. We went round to our neighbours on the Thurs and Fri evenings trying to inform them but the property was unoccupied. On the Sat we cut the trees ensuring that as much as possible, nothing went their side but inevitably a few bits did. We then sent a letter explaining that we had tried to inform them but they weren't there and we were obviously not going to trespass. Now the following Tues we receive a letter explainig that he was there all day on the Sat asking why didn't we go round. I have been round to ask why he didn't let us know that he was there, either by knocking on our front door or by coming out into his garden and then we would have gone through and finished off / tidied up. Iam really cross because we have taken reasonable steps to resolve this amicably between us and had he made us aware of his presence on Saturday we would have gone into his garden to clear up as stated in our previous letter. My husband and I work and are unable to now go his side to clear up. He is also requesting that we trim the hedge his side when he has always maintained it for the past 9 years. Do we legally have to go and pick up the stray bits fallen his side (even though we would have done had we of known he was there) and do we have to maintain the hedge his side? Many thanks.
Harvey - 10-Oct-17 @ 2:13 PM
clipper - Your Question:
I have a fourty year old hedge clearly planted on my property which is well maintained on my side. It forms a boundary with my neighbour. They are not maintaining the hedge on their side. I would like it clipped at least twice a year and would be happy to do it and clear up but the neighbour will not grant me access. As a result the hedge is acquiring a more open habit. I am anxious that it does not deteriorate further. What rights do I have to maintain or order the maintenance of my hedge?

Our Response:
The access to neighbouring property legislation really only applies to property and not to land/garden unfortunately. On the other hand a hedge owner does have a responsibility to maintain a hedge so that it does damage a neighbour's property...the law is a bit ambiguous when it comes to hedges!
ProblemNeighbours - 8-Aug-17 @ 1:55 PM
I have a fourty year oldhedge clearly planted onmy property which is well maintained on my side.It forms a boundary with my neighbour. They arenot maintaining the hedge on their side. I would like it clipped at least twice a year and would be happy to do it and clear up but the neighbour will not grant me access. As a result the hedge is acquiring a more open habit. I am anxious that it does not deteriorate further. What rights do I have to maintain or order the maintenance of my hedge?
clipper - 6-Aug-17 @ 9:25 AM
charlie - Your Question:
We have a 5ft retainer wall behind our property and have a laurel hedge on top of the retainer wall ( the land behind us is sloped)and is owned by a man who lives further along the street, about 10 houses away. He planted the same type of laurels behind the laurel hedge we had already there and behind this hedge he also planted a further row of conifers as a hedge. About 300 metres behind these hedges on higher ground he has also planted has a row of laurels which are now 40ft high. So there are now four rows of hedges behind our property,one ours and three his. Our back garden is in complete darkness from September to March. Five years ago when we went to trim our hedge which was about 6ft high at this time, he objected saying they were intertwined with his and we were cutting his hedge as well and he wanted to find out how he legally stood. Five years on he refuses to communicate with us about lowering the height of his three hedges and objects to us cutting our laurels as well.The three hedges bordering our property are now 14ft high on top of a 5ft retainer wall and the hedge further behind on the slope are now at least 40ft high.

Our Response:
It sounds as though the legislation described in the above article will be relevant for you. Hopefully it's clear what you can do from the article. Let us know how you go on.
ProblemNeighbours - 4-Aug-17 @ 10:34 AM
ANESKA - Your Question:
Our neighbour's property is surrounded by our garden. It is on the hill and we have a sea view. The owner of the mentioned property rents it out as a holiday house. Basically their little garden with the view of the sea is surrounded by our lawn-field and the boundary is a low wire fence. It is as not private as it can get. I wanted to plant a hedge to make my garden private as every week new people stare at it and the back of my house, they also set their dogs loose in my garden, but that's another story. I received a letter from my neighbour's solicitor saying that a hedge would be seen as an act of antisocial behaviour as the key point of the rental of that in-land property is the sea view. Any advice? Many thanks.

Our Response:
It's feasible, especially if the property has benefitted from that view for some time. Could you plant strategically to provide privacy and maintain their view? It would be for a judge to decide whether this constituted antisocial behaviour.
ProblemNeighbours - 2-Aug-17 @ 10:35 AM
We have a 5ft retainer wall behind our property and have a laurel hedge on top of the retainer wall ( the land behind us is sloped)and is owned by a man who lives further along the street, about 10 houses away.He planted the same type of laurels behind the laurel hedge we had already there and behind this hedge he also planted a further row of conifers as a hedge. About 300 metres behind these hedges on higher ground he has also planted has a row of laurels which are now 40ft high. So there are now four rows of hedges behind our property,one ours and three his. Our back garden is in complete darkness from September to March. Five years ago when we went to trim our hedge which was about 6ft high at this time, he objected saying they were intertwined with his and we were cutting his hedge as well and he wanted to find out how he legally stood. Five years on he refuses to communicate with us aboutlowering the height of his three hedges and objects to us cutting our laurels as well.The three hedges bordering our property are now 14ft high on top of a 5ft retainer wall and the hedge further behind on the slope are now at least 40ft high.
charlie - 1-Aug-17 @ 4:17 PM
Our neighbour's property is surrounded by our garden. It is on the hill and we have a sea view. The owner of the mentioned property rents it out as a holiday house. Basically their little garden with the view of the sea is surrounded by our lawn-field and the boundary is a low wire fence. It is as not private as it can get. I wanted to plant a hedge to make my garden private as every week new people stare at it and the back of my house, they also set their dogs loose in my garden, but that's another story. I received a letter from my neighbour's solicitor saying that a hedge would be seen as an act of antisocial behaviour as the key point of the rental of that in-land property is the sea view. Any advice? Many thanks.
ANESKA - 29-Jul-17 @ 5:36 PM
meggie87 - Your Question:
Hi I have a real pain of a neighbour that last year told me to cut down all my bamboos because the roots where growing into her garden. On this occasion I hired a gardener to place a barrier in the soil so the roots no longer grew into their property and repaired the damages. Now she has come over and demanded we get a gardener in to trim back a bush in the front garden that is growing into her garden do I need to do this as im sure that they are free to trim the hedge on there side ? Thanks for any help

Our Response:
No you are not under any obligation to do this. Your neighbour can trim back any growth that overhangs her side of the property. See our guide here
ProblemNeighbours - 22-Jun-17 @ 11:38 AM
Hi I have a real pain of a neighbour that last year told me to cut down all my bamboos because the roots where growing into her garden. On this occasion I hired a gardener to place a barrier in the soil so the roots no longer grew into their property and repaired the damages. Now she has come over and demanded we get a gardener in to trim back a bush in the front garden that is growing into her garden do I need to do this as im sure that they are free to trim the hedge on there side ? Thanks for any help
meggie87 - 20-Jun-17 @ 8:34 AM
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