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Curbing Dog Barking for Dog Owners

By: Jeff Durham - Updated: 20 Jul 2018 | comments*Discuss
 
Incessant Dog Barking Help Incessant Dog

First, it’s important to state that barking is a natural means of communication for a dog and occasional barking is not a sufficient reason to approach your local authority as this does not represent a Statutory Noise Nuisance. However, if the barking persists over a prolonged period of time or at unreasonable hours of the night, then it may result in an investigation being carried out by your local authority.

Understanding Reasons Why Dogs Bark

The most common reasons a dog will bark are:

  • To seek attention
  • To defend its territory
  • To display pleasure or excitement
  • To express boredom, frustration or loneliness
  • It may have a medical problem which is causing it discomfort or pain

Preventing your Dog from Becoming a Barking Nuisance

Any incessant barking should not be ignored by a dog owner. If the behaviour isn’t checked in some way, or you just ignore the dog completely in the hope that it will stop, the chances are that the dog will perceive your inaction as permission to carry on barking. That’s not to say that you should punish the dog each time it barks. It might simply be expressing its excitement at seeing you, or as the result of you playing a game with it which it enjoys.

But your dog needs to understand when barking is permitted and where it needs to restrain itself, and that only comes with proper training. There are plenty of training manuals you could use or, alternatively, you could always enrol your dog in a training class or have a dog trainer visit you at home.

More often than not, the main problems arise when the owner is not present to check the dog. Therefore, if you go out for long periods, this could trigger the incessant barking. And, unless your dog is highly trained, don’t keep it outside in a kennel if it’s the type of dog that has an incessant barking problem.

Training your Dog

All responsible dog owners should Deal With Their Dog's Barking.While proper training can usually help to resolve most dog barking problems, there are other things you can do to alleviate the problem. First, make sure that even when you’re in the house, you don’t always allow the dog to be in the same room as you. Many dogs will naturally follow you around from room to room like a ‘shadow’ without you even noticing. Try putting your dog in another room and leave it for a few minutes. Tell it to ‘stay’ and if it follows you, take it back and admonish it.

Lower tones of voice are better than higher tones in terms of a dog’s understanding that it’s being told off, whereas higher tones signify an owner’s pleasure or praise. If it persists in barking when separated, go back to the room and, in a low tone of voice issue the command ‘QUIET’! Repeating this exercise over and over until the dog understands what you want it to do will often work.

Once it responds to this action repeatedly, go back into the room and praise the dog using a higher tone of voice and make a fuss of it. These types of high and low tone communications will often help a dog understand what you expect of it in all kinds of situations, not simply barking related.

Understanding your Dog’s Needs

You should, by now, have mastered the art of training your dog to obey commands when you’re at home, but what about when you have to go out to work or to the shops? In these situations, there are still steps you can take to ensure that your dog’s barking does not become a problem. Here are some things you should bear in mind to ensure your dog does not become a Problem Pet:

  • Make sure your dog has been exercised and fed before you go out, and that it has access to fresh water.
  • If your dog barks incessantly whenever anyone passes by your front window, put it in a room or other location where it cannot see out of any window. Make sure it has its own bed or other comfortable area in which to rest or sleep, even if that’s just a pile of old blankets. It needs to be able to associate with a place of quiet and rest.
  • If your dog is the type that likes to always be mentally stimulated and plays with toys a lot, make sure you leave some for it to play with while you’re away.
  • Make sure that the room you leave the dog is not too hot and is kept well ventilated.
  • Some dogs respond well to soothing music or even the sound of other voices, so it can often be useful to leave a radio on while you’re out.
  • If you’re going to be out for quite a lengthy period, make sure you arrange for someone to have access to your house who can come in periodically and check on the dog, can let it out to go to the toilet and, perhaps, someone who could even take it for a walk.

All of these things can help alleviate dog barking problems but should they persist, you should call upon the help of an expert dog trainer.

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Frustrated - Your Question:
We have had our westie for 3 yrs she's a typical terrier In that she yaps when the door goes or she's in the garden and can see someone outside that she doesn't recognise but so far has been fine. Over the last few weeks someone has either moved into the estate with a cat /someone has got a new cat or there's a stray either way there is now a cat coming into our garden regularly. it sunbathes on our grass climbs on our kids toys chases birds and Also peers into our hutch. Our dog senses it and barks to protect the guinea pig and her own territory. The cat now comes and goes so frequenrly its scent is in the garden all the time so everytime she goes out she barks incessantly at the tree and fence it comes and goes by. We have two young girls under 2 so having her bark in the house is sometimes ok but other times we need to open the door to let her investigate and warn off said cat. In hot weather we can't keep our doors and windows closed nor can we banish her from.her own garden. Today a neighbour came to the house to complain and was very hostile. How do we fair as far as any formal complaint she may make? Walking feeding playing giving attention isn't going to work if her territory is 'being threatened' and other than these instances she's fairly well behaved so being made to pay for behavioural classes or face the possibility of having her taken away seem really unfair. She actually gets more stressed inside the house knowing the cat is outside. We live in a room on the back of the house surrounded by windows so theres nowhere to go where she has no view of the garden. I may add we do not let her stay out before 8 or after 9 and if she barks around those times we bring her straight in. She has the run of the house and garden she is never locked out. I wotk from home (when im not on maternity leave) so shes rarely left alone and she gets walked every day for around an hour. I'm at a loss and now very upset. any advice welcome.

Our Response:
Perhaps taking steps to get rid of the cat might be more successful? There are lots of tips to be found on the Internet but here are some from one of our articles on this site:"Some tips, like citronella sprays or leaving black pepper around the garden, work for some cats and not others. You could investigate the option of an ultrasonic noise emitters which emit a cat-scaring sound, or even opt for the simpler remedy if you’re at home during the day – cats detest water, so a well aimed water pistol won’t harm them but will hopefully deter them from relieving themselves on your lawn!"
ProblemNeighbours - 23-Jul-18 @ 3:23 PM
We have had our westie for 3 yrs she's a typical terrier In that she yaps when the door goes or she's in the garden and can see someone outside that she doesn't recognise but so far has been fine. Over the last few weeks someone has either moved into the estate with a cat /someone has got a new cat or there's a stray either way there is now a cat coming into our garden regularly.. it sunbathes on our grass climbs on our kids toys chases birds and Also peers into our hutch. Our dog senses it and barks to protect the guinea pig and her own territory . The cat now comes and goes so frequenrly its scent is in the garden all the time so everytime she goes out she barks incessantly at the tree and fence it comes and goes by. We have two young girls under 2 so having her bark in the house is sometimes ok but other times we need to open the door to let her investigate and warn off said cat. In hot weather we can't keep our doors and windows closed nor can we banish her from.her own garden. Today a neighbour came to the house to complain and was very hostile. How do we fair as far as any formal complaint she may make? Walking feeding playing giving attention isn't going to work if her territory is 'being threatened' and other than these instances she's fairly well behaved so being made to pay for behavioural classes or face the possibility of having her taken away seem really unfair. She actually gets more stressed inside the house knowing the cat is outside. We live in a room on the back of the house surrounded by windows so theres nowhere to go where she has no view of the garden. I may add we do not let her stay out before 8 or after 9 and if she barks around those times we bring her straight in. She has the run of the house and garden she is never locked out. I wotk from home (when im not on maternity leave) so shes rarely left alone and she gets walked every day for around an hour... I'm at a loss and now very upset .. any advice welcome.
Frustrated - 20-Jul-18 @ 10:23 AM
New neighbors have moved into our rural road and their dogs are roaming about. The other neighbors and myself can no longer walk our dogs up the road, as one dog (Rottweiler) is quite aggressive. One of the male walkers has tried to approach them but the owner got quite aggressive (a bit like the dog!) who can we turn to for help?
Charliebigpots - 20-Apr-18 @ 10:00 AM
Hello. 2 days ago, we bought a puppy, he is a great little chap, friendly, loving and cute.. But, when we leave the house, our neighbour complains that our new puppy is crying and howling.. I have tried to explain that he will be feeling insecure and lonely for the first few weeks until the little chap settles in, but our neighbour is relentless, complaining endlessly.. Without seeming to defensive, our neighbour has alway been a bit of a nightmare, she complains about everyone and everything.. We simply don't know what to do, because even though we have only had our puppy two days, our neighbour say she is going to ring the council and report us.. Where do we stand with this matter..? Our puppy has water, food, lots of toys and we leave the TV on for company for him.. Regards. Lee.
lee - 31-May-13 @ 11:17 PM
I have a neighbour he frequently leaves his dog in the house while he goes to work during the day and some nights when it appears there is no one home all night with the dog. The incessant barking is driving me mad as I do 7 nights and have 7 off. I have spoken and texted the landlord day and night when this happens and his response is he has spoken to the owner and it won't happen again.
hotjean - 22-May-11 @ 9:43 PM
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