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Parking Disputes Between Neighbours

By: Jeff Durham - Updated: 15 Dec 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Parking Disputes Obstruct Neighbour

Many conflicts between neighbours arise as the result of disputes over parked cars. Of course, if you have a separate driveway then there isn’t a problem, as long as you actually park on it, but issues do arise when people park their cars on the road upon which they live.

Having off street parking not only increases the value of a property but it also reduce the risk of neighbour arguments over where to park the car. In some residential areas, often London, parking permits are charged at a premium rate and don't always resolve the parking problems, as residents think they have a right to park in front of their house since they have paid for a permit.

The Highway Code is there to explain and guide you through the rules and regulations set out in myriad pieces of traffic and road legislation.For example:

  • Drivers should all be aware that you cannot park or wait on double yellow lines at any time.
  • You must not wait or park on single yellow lines at the times stated on corresponding signs.
  • You must not wait, stop, or park on school entrance markings.
  • Unless you are entitled to, you must not park in disabled parking spaces or resident parking spaces.
  • You must also not park in front of the entrance to a property.
There are many more rules which you should read and be aware of before taking any action, you can find the full list at www.gov.uk

Many parking disputes arise over the failure to observe parking ‘etiquette’ on the street where you live. But etiquette and the law are two totally different issues, so let’s take a look at both.

What The Law Says

As long as your vehicle is taxed and you are not contravening any other traffic laws, you are allowed to park anywhere on a public highway (but not on footpaths/pavements) where it is legal to do so.

Parking Outside Your Own House

Etiquette, good manners and common sense are the main ingredients in avoiding parking disputes with your neighbours. Most people would choose to park outside their own home anyway because of the convenience, but what if you have more than one vehicle belonging to a single property and there are no driveways or you have a driveway but there is only enough room for one car?

No Automatic Right to Park Outside Your Home

Basically, it’s an unwritten ‘rule’ that people will generally tend to park outside their own home but it’s important to note that no one has an automatic right to do so. It’s not always possible and, in addition to residents, other road users also have the right to park outside your home providing they are not contravening the Highway Code.

To resolve this issue, the only thing you can do is to try to have a friendly word with your neighbour and explain to them why you’d prefer to park in front of your own house. You may find that they didn’t realise it bothered you and often simple courtesy and communicating your issue with your neighbour will resolve the problem.

Shared Driveways

If you share a driveway with your next door neighbour and a parking dispute occurs because of lack of space or one person’s vehicle is taking up more space, you can resolve this by checking your house deeds to find out where the boundaries lie.

Accessibility and Upkeep of a Shared Driveway

It’s courteous to share responsibilities for the accessibility and tidiness of a shared driveway. If you have children, make sure you keep any toys off the other person's part of the shared driveway. If your next door neighbour simply decides they’ve had enough and drives straight in and ‘accidentally’ runs over a children’s toy, you’ve no legal redress – it’s your neighbour’s part of the driveway and your responsibility to keep things that belong to you, on your side.

The Big Issue – Parking Directly In Front Of A Person’s Driveway

This is, by far, the single most frequent cause of annoyance and arguments between neighbours. Unfortunately though, the law does not help in this regard. It's common courtesy not to park directly in front of the driveway of another person’s property. After all, they may need to get in or out of the driveway with their vehicle. If you’ve blocked the access by parking directly in front of it, this will cause the vast majority, if not everybody, to become annoyed and to try to locate the owner of the vehicle to get them to move it. Therefore, most neighbourly people will never park directly in front of someone’s driveway.

What is the Relevant Law on Blocking Someone's Driveway?

The Highway Code, paragraph 207, asks that people DO NOT park their vehicle where it might cause an obstruction to other pedestrians or road users, and cites the example of not parking in front of another person’s driveway.

In essence, while there are certain rules and regulations under the Highway Code relating to parking on public highways, mostly it’s a matter of common decency and courtesy. Speaking calmly to neighbours and explaining reasons why you might need to park here or there, if practical, will usually result in you getting what you want. Just remember, however, that unless they are breaking the law, people are entitled to park anywhere they want to on a public highway providing they aren’t in breach of the Highway Code. If things get really bad, you could try and get a third party involved to mediate...take a look at our feature When Mediation Can Help Neighbour disputes for more information and advice.

Dropped Kerbs: The Traffic Management Act 2004

If you have a dropped kerb at the end of your driveway (which in most local authorities - planning laws say that you should), the Traffic Management Act 2004 might help you. This act covers restrictions on parking where a kerb has been dropped for a number of reasons including for the purpose of "assisting vehicles entering or leaving the carriageway across the footway, cycle track or verge". There are exceptions to this including:
  • Where the vehicle is parked outside residential premises "by or with the consent (but not consent given for reward) of the occupier of the premises" but this exception does not apply in the case of a shared driveway
  • Emergency vehicles
  • When a vehicle is being used for the purposes of delivering goods/unloading etc at the premises (has to be 'reasonable' and for no longer than 20 minutes)
  • Vehicles undertaking any building, signing, utilities or sewer works or collecting waste on behalf of local authority, removing a traffic obstruction

If you think you could have a case under this piece of legislation, first try to find and speak to the vehicle owner. In a friendly and polite manner, tell them about the act and that you'd like to get your vehicle out. If they refuse, call the police on 101 - not 999 (it's more than likely NOT an emergency and if it is, the vehicle owner will probably cooperate with you anyhow). Tell them about the problem, how long the vehicle has been there and that you need to get your car out. If they say there's nothing they can do, ask them about the Traffic Management act of 2004 (referring to dropped kerbs) and what they normal steps are. They should be able to help you to take the right steps even if they won't do anything themselves immediately.

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[Add a Comment]
Hi all, I live in a cul-de-sack which is very narrow. I own the only house which has no driveway. My neighbour who is a family of 4 and they all own cars but have a drive which only fits 2 cars. So the other two are parked on the cul-de-sack and one in front of my house. This is a problem for me because being a car driver myself leaves me struggling to find parking space. So I usually end up parking on another street. I have tried speaking with the neighbours. But was rudely told to get on my bike as there is no law stating they can not park outside my house so it's a first come first serve basis. I was wondering if it's worth contacting Birmingham city council and asking them what can be done but don't know where to start. Any ideas please
ASH - 15-Dec-17 @ 3:14 PM
Teddy - Your Question:
My neighbour has just moved in and has started parking his massive transit Anglian Water van outside the front of the house. It’s not directly outside our windows (yet) but it’s half way up the pedestrian pathway blocking the pushchair getting through. We have our own driveway and park there. They also have private parking but appear to prefer parking their cars on the driveway and then dumping their work van outside our house? Can anything be done?

Our Response:
If you can't get your pushchair through (and the same would automatically apply to a wheel chair user), your local police should be able to do something about this. You can contact them on the non-emergency 101 number, or contact your local PCSO.You could also contact the neighbour's employer Anglian Water and tell them that one of their employees is obstructing the pathway. There is also a letter template here which you could use if you want to drop your neighbour a note about this.
ProblemNeighbours - 4-Dec-17 @ 12:19 PM
My neighbour has just moved in and has started parking his massive transit Anglian Water van outside the front of the house. It’s not directly outside our windows (yet) but it’s half way up the pedestrian pathway blocking the pushchair getting through. We have our own driveway and park there. They also have private parking but appear to prefer parking their cars on the driveway and then dumping their work van outside our house? Can anything be done?
Teddy - 3-Dec-17 @ 4:32 PM
Hi I live in a dead end street where's there's semi detached houses so we all have drive ways. However there is a house in the middle at the end of the street his address belongs to the other side (culd de sac) as that is his entrance and his actual drive way. However he has made an entrance (drive way) in the middle of my street by knocking his wall down. He used to park his car in the middle of the street rather than in his garden ( just to point out his garden is not wide or big enough for a car). The neighbour hood complaint several times when an entrance was made to the council but it was ignored. After many years and phone calls to the police they have decided to use a highway code of double parking as the street is not large enough to park a car in the middle. Now the person does not park his whole van in the middle. He parks 2 wheels inside his garden and the rest on the road still obstructing our driveways and turning points. There's is no footpath at the end of the road either so he has no actual driveway. The council say they can't give him tickets unless all 4 wheels are on the road. What can be done about this? What are the rules and regulations. The council are quite lazy and ignore the matte
jay sean - 22-Nov-17 @ 3:59 PM
Hi, I live on a street which has limited parking and for some time now two council owned maintenance vehicles (lorry and van) park on the street taking up spaces for about 5 cars. Is this ok? Shouldn’t the council offer parking elsewhere for their workers vehicles? They are unsightly and I am having problems selling my house as three buyers have asked if these vehicles are always in front or near my house.
Joey - 21-Nov-17 @ 3:21 PM
My neighbor bought a two-family house his yard is facing me. He took down the fence and started parking in the backyard which is practically under my window I can reach out and touch his truck. Is this legal? Doesn't he have to get permission from the city to do this? How many feet away from my window does he have to be?
Donna - 11-Nov-17 @ 4:33 PM
Superhandstbh- Your Question:
Hello, I've been living in an apartment above a high street shops for almost 10 years now. My girlfriend who also lives here has now passed her test and parks her car on the narrow throughroad behind our flat/the shop. This road is shared with 4 other shop users cars. Everyone seems to share this fine besides one shop that wants to dicktate we have no right nor does anyone else to park there. Simply because they "own" their business and we only rent the property? My landlord has been informed of this numerous times and maintains its my issue to resolve even though this neighbour is constantly threatening to go back to him. My girlfriend has offered a peaceful resolve that if her car is in anyway, in the way they can text her and she will move it instantly. This offer was rejected. No other neighbour complains of cars in the way. How is best to go about this? We have no other local parking available due to a heavy doubly yellow area. Please help as this is becoming almost confrontational. Thankyou

Our Response:
If your girlfriend's car is blocking the shop user's access it's unreasonable to expect them to have to contact her everytime they want to get past. If there are no appropriate parking spaces, there is not much you can do about this apart from asking her to park in another street.
ProblemNeighbours - 7-Nov-17 @ 9:24 AM
Hello, I've been living in an apartment above a high street shops for almost 10 years now. My girlfriend who also lives here has now passed her test and parks her car on the narrow throughroad behind our flat/the shop. This road is shared with 4 other shop users cars. Everyone seems to share this fine besides one shop that wants to dicktate we have no right nor does anyone else to park there. Simply because they "own" their business and we only rent the property? My landlord has been informed of this numerous times and maintains its my issue to resolve even though this neighbour is constantly threatening to go back to him. My girlfriend has offered a peaceful resolve that if her car is in anyway, in the way they can text her and she will move it instantly. This offer was rejected. No other neighbour complains of cars in the way. How is best to go about this? We have no other local parking available due to a heavy doubly yellow area. Please help as this is becoming almost confrontational. Thankyou
Superhandstbh - 31-Oct-17 @ 6:23 PM
JF - Your Question:
Hello, I recently moved into a house in a small car-free development (houses built and connected behind shops) so parking is a nightmare at times as park and display spaces on main road quickly get taken up throughout the daytime hours of operation. The development has a small gravel driveway where cars can drive through and quickly park to load and unload, e.g groceries, but, out of courtesy, must leave when finished so as to not block driving path for other residents wishing to get in. There is a small space at the beginning of this driveway that is large enough for two cars. It is directly behind a business, a hair salon. I parked my car here once only to be told I couldn’t as it is only for the hair salon. I moved my car thinking nothing of it. I don’t want to continue paying for my parking every single day as my council will not grant me a parking permit because of the car-free development- but there is no signage whatsoever indicating the small space is for the salon, could this simply be a case of first come, first serve parking? I should add that as time went on, I have noticed that all the bins for me and other residents on this driveway are kept in that clear space - surely this is a clear sign this is public space otherwise the hair salon would have complained by now? Also the space is overgrown with weed. Another sign of public space? My friend says the hair salon does not own the “dead” space behind the shops. Please advise. Thank you.

Our Response:
We aren't in a position to advise on this sorry, you will have to ask the land owner or the local council.
ProblemNeighbours - 30-Oct-17 @ 3:40 PM
Hello, I recently moved into a house in a small car-free development (houses built and connected behind shops) so parking is a nightmare at times as park and display spaces on main road quickly get taken up throughout the daytime hours of operation. The development has a small gravel driveway where cars can drive through and quickly park to load and unload, e.ggroceries, but, out of courtesy, must leave when finished so as to not block driving path for other residents wishing to get in. There is a small space at the beginning of this driveway that is large enough for two cars. It is directly behind a business, a hair salon. I parked my car here once only to be told I couldn’t as it is only for the hair salon. I moved my car thinking nothing of it. I don’t want to continue paying for my parking every single day as my council will not grant me a parking permit because of the car-free development- but there is no signage whatsoever indicating the small space is for the salon, could this simply be a case of first come, first serve parking? I should add that as time went on, I have noticed that all the bins for me and other residents on this driveway are kept in that clear space - surely this is a clear sign this is public space otherwise the hair salon would have complained by now? Also the space is overgrown with weed. Another sign of public space? My friend says the hair salon does not own the “dead” space behind the shops. Please advise. Thank you.
JF - 29-Oct-17 @ 3:38 PM
Hi, my neighbour keeps parking their car on the road infront of the steps i have to use to gain access to my flat, their door literally opens up on the steps! My question, is this a hazard incase of emergency, say an ambulance had to take 1 of us in a stretcher I don't think the paramedics would be able to turn! Also I have to wheel my wheelie bins down those steps and I'm worried it may topple over 1 day n smash their window! Is this leagle? Are there any laws on parking infront of steps please?
Km - 25-Oct-17 @ 5:32 AM
Hi I live in Wembley and have off street parking and is a cul de sac.There is a single yellow line one side as the road leading into the roundabout is narrow. The problem is there is not enough spaces for the 70 or so flats. One particular resident often as up to 5 cars in the road and doing car repairs and his friends also congest the road whilst waiting. I would like to know what can be done as the cars have their number plates taken off. I often have to park third a mile away on a road that I feel unsafe and dark. I would to report this resident and free up some spaces.
Annoyed neighbour - 10-Oct-17 @ 7:26 PM
I have had problems with my neighbours intentionally blocking my car in outside my house . The police on one of their visits to them informed them I was having a driveway put in and when. My contractors arrived yesterday to mark out the path for the dropped kerb and cones was placed on the road. Neighbour moves the cones purposely takes his car off the drive and parked there last night. And as he goes out at anytime with his breakdown lorry he might be out when the contractors arrive later on today.and I'm sure if he is home he won't open the door to them when they go round to ask him to move. Basically he has purposely parked to stop my kerb being lowered. I rang the police for advice they haven't the powers to tow it or get him to move it as they say he is legally parked.the highway dept say they have no powers. So I'm very worried that this vile neighbour is trying to stop my workmen .
Snuggs - 26-Sep-17 @ 9:41 AM
AndyP - Your Question:
I live in a village and parking can be a problem as we have a very popular local pub. A resident has a driveway and has decided to knock a wall down to widen his driveway but has not paid to have the kerb dropped and does not intend to. He has now put up a sign advising people not to park in front. Now I feel that I can still park in that spot until the kerb is dropped. Myself and other residents have already had words with the gentleman but to no avail. Is there anybody we can contact about this?

Our Response:
Contact your local council's highways department. If he is using the opening as a driveway (or marking it out as such with signs), then he should pay for the kerb to be dropped (and will also need relevant permissions).
ProblemNeighbours - 19-Sep-17 @ 2:17 PM
I live in a village and parking can be a problem as we have a very popular local pub. A resident has a driveway and has decided to knock a wall down to widen his driveway but has not paid to have the kerb dropped and does not intend to. He has now put up a sign advising people not to park in front. Now I feel that I can still park in that spot until the kerb is dropped. Myself and other residents have already had words with the gentleman but to no avail. Is there anybody we can contact about this?
AndyP - 18-Sep-17 @ 2:41 PM
Val - Your Question:
Hi,I'm having some problems with a neighbour regarding parking. We live in a village in Essex and our house doesn't have a parking bay. We used to park our car on a side road, but a neighbour complained that she couldn't see incoming traffic when she joined the main road (doubt it was the case), so we moved our car & van and parked it in front on the house on the main road. There are no restrictions and as far as I know (confirmed by the Council and the Police) the parking is legal. The speed limit in the area is 30mph. This time I received a letter from a neighbour (not sure it's the same as it didn't introduce her/himself) complaining about our cars and threatened to complain the police and council. I'm really baffled. I do care but other people, but there are no other options for me. I'm not sure what I should do next. Thank you

Our Response:
If you are parking legally, the police./council won't be able to do anything, so your best response is to just ignore.
ProblemNeighbours - 14-Sep-17 @ 2:42 PM
Hi, I'm having some problems with a neighbour regarding parking. We live in a village in Essex and our house doesn't have a parking bay. We used to park our car on a side road, but a neighbour complained that she couldn't see incoming traffic when she joined the main road (doubt it was the case), so we moved our car & van and parked it in front on the house on the main road. There are no restrictions and as far as I know (confirmed by the Council and the Police) the parking is legal. The speed limit in the area is 30mph. This time I received a letter from a neighbour (not sure it's the same as it didn't introduce her/himself) complaining about our cars and threatened to complain the police and council. I'm really baffled. I do care but other people, but there are no other options for me. I'm not sure what I should do next. Thank you
Val - 12-Sep-17 @ 3:03 PM
Drained - Your Question:
Neighbour parked on my drive right outside my door, making it impossible for me to use my space, meaning I had to park a few streets away. When asked, she told me they were having family over and needed their own 3 spaces for them. She told me she had the owner's permission to park outside my door. Interesting assertion: I am the owner. When I explained that to her and that she couldn't park there because it was making it impossible for me to use my own space, she told me her husband had gone to work and she couldn't drive. My insurance covers me for third party on other cars so I told her I would drive her car to another space, preferably her own. She reluctantly agreed and a few weeks later, when I saw her driving the same car, I congratulated her on passing her test. There had never been any L plates in sight.

Our Response:
Sounds like she was certainly leading you on!
ProblemNeighbours - 12-Sep-17 @ 2:17 PM
Neighbour parked on my drive right outside my door, making it impossible for me to use my space, meaning I had to park a few streets away.When asked, she told me they were having family over and needed their own 3 spaces for them.She told me she had the owner's permission to park outside my door.Interesting assertion: I am the owner.When I explained that to her and that she couldn't park there because it was making it impossible for me to use my own space, she told me her husband had gone to work and she couldn't drive.My insurance covers me for third party on other cars so I told her I would drive her car to another space, preferably her own. She reluctantly agreed and a few weeks later, when I saw her driving the same car, I congratulated her on passing her test.There had never been any L plates in sight.
Drained - 11-Sep-17 @ 6:44 PM
T. J. - Your Question:
I live on an adopted road where all the parking spaces are on private land. Each flat has an allocated parking space. There are several parking spaces allocated to visitors. One of my neighbours ( recently moved in) is running a car business from his address and is parking cars in all visitors spaces. He has anything from 5 to 8 cars parked up at any one time. There are groups of men in our street morning and evening picking up cars and dropping them off. The majority of my neighbours have complained but it appears their complaints are not being listened to. As a result of our neighbours actions we are concerned about security. In all the years I've lived in my property(12) this has never been an issue until now. My neighbour was burgled a few days ago. Due to our road being a no through road ( court ) we used to know everyone that came and went and would notice if someone suspicious was hanging around. Now we just don't know who is legit and who isn't. Came someone please help!

Our Response:
Most council planning departments will be able to tell you if there are any local conditions about operating a commercial business in a residential road/area. This might resolve the issue quickest. Is there a management company (if you own) or a landlord (if you rent) for the building/blocks of flats? If so, complain to them, they should be able to force the new neighbour to stop. Failing that, you and your other neighbours could consider grouping together and taking private legal action for nuisance/anti social behaviour etc.
ProblemNeighbours - 6-Sep-17 @ 2:01 PM
I live on an adopted road where all the parking spaces are on private land. Each flat has an allocated parking space. There are several parking spaces allocated to visitors. One of my neighbours ( recently moved in)is running a car business from his address and is parking cars in all visitors spaces. He has anything from 5 to 8 cars parked up at any one time. There are groups of men in our street morning and evening picking up cars and dropping them off. The majority of my neighbours have complained but it appears their complaints are not being listened to. As a result of our neighbours actions we are concerned about security. In all the years I've lived in my property(12)this has never been an issue until now. My neighbour was burgled a few days ago. Due to our road being a no through road ( court ) we used to know everyone that came and went and would notice if someone suspicious was hanging around. Now we just don't know who is legit and who isn't. Came someone please help!
T. J. - 4-Sep-17 @ 8:50 PM
we live in a cul de sac with a car park at the end, all the houses have driveways except mine and 3 others, our house is owned by housing association,and they own the land the estate is built on, we pay a service charge to maintain grass areas. our nextdoor neighbours daughter caused parking problems in the past when she lived there , she no longer lives there now but yesterday she parked on a grass area outside our houses, which not only ruins the grass arae we all pay to keep maintained she is also preventing us now parking our car on the road infront of the grassed area as we would be blocking her in. she is not approachable, and our housing association issued an antisocial order to them a couple of years ago for harrasing us constantly asking us to move our car so they could park there. this evening she has knocked whilst my teenage daughters were alone screaming to her family she wants our car moving from the road so she can park on the grass. she also screamed that she knew we were in and just wont open the door!! where do we stand on this? i am also disabled and hae a blue badge, but i have a feeling so does she(for reasons im unsure but are not for herself) so a disabled bay probably wouldnt work, ive messaged my housing association , but they were not much help last time. our car is parked completley legally on the roadside, but if she is parked on the grass area are we breaking the law parking in our usual place on the roadside despite we would be blocking her in?
kerryah - 23-Aug-17 @ 6:23 PM
we live in a cul de sac with a car park at the end, all the houses have driveways except mine and 3 others, our house is owned by housing association,and they own the land the estate is built on, we pay a service charge to maintain grass areas. our nextdoor neighbours daughter caused parking problems in the past when she lived there , she no longer lives there now but yesterday she parked on a grass area outside our houses, which not only ruins the grass arae we all pay to keep maintained she is also preventing us now parking our car on the road infront of the grassed area as we would be blocking her in. she is not approachable, and our housing association issued an antisocial order to them a couple of years ago for harrasing us constantly asking us to move our car so they could park there. this evening she has knocked whilst my teenage daughters were alone screaming to her family she wants our car moving from the road so she can park on the grass. she also screamed that she knew we were in and just wont open the door!! where do we stand on this? i am also disabled and hae a blue badge, but i have a feeling so does she(for reasons im unsure but are not for herself) so a disabled bay probably wouldnt work, ive messaged my housing association , but they were not much help last time. our car is parked completley legally on the roadside, but if she is parked on the grass area are we breaking the law parking in our usual place on the roadside despite we would be blocking her in?
kerryah - 22-Aug-17 @ 7:30 PM
we live in a cul de sac with a car park at the end, all the houses have driveways except mine and 3 others, our house is owned by housing association,and they own the land the estate is built on, we pay a service charge to maintain grass areas. our nextdoor neighbours daughter caused parking problems in the past when she lived there , she no longer lives there now but yesterday she parked on a grass area outside our houses, which not only ruins the grass arae we all pay to keep maintained she is also preventing us now parking our car on the road infront of the grassed area as we would be blocking her in. she is not approachable, and our housing association issued an antisocial order to them a couple of years ago for harrasing us constantly asking us to move our car so they could park there. this evening she has knocked whilst my teenage daughters were alone screaming to her family she wants our car moving from the road so she can park on the grass. she also screamed that she knew we were in and just wont open the door!! where do we stand on this? i am also disabled and hae a blue badge, but i have a feeling so does she(for reasons im unsure but are not for herself) so a disabled bay probably wouldnt work, ive messaged my housing association , but they were not much help last time. our car is parked completley legally on the roadside, but if she is parked on the grass area are we breaking the law parking in our usual place on the roadside despite we would be blocking her in?
kerryah - 22-Aug-17 @ 7:16 PM
grommy - Your Question:
Hi, we have off road parking spots which accomodates 4 vehicles on my side of the road next to garages. My side of the road has maisonettes where there are no drives so it's parking half on/half off the path. Is it possible to have an official sign saying "residents only" for the 4 off road spaces as residents across the road (with drives!) are abusing the little space we have by parking their friends cars their whilst they go on holiday for days and weeks at a time. Is there any legal route where we can make it "residential only" due to the limited space to actual residents that need those spaces.

Our Response:
You need to contact the council about this (assuming it's a public road).
ProblemNeighbours - 9-Aug-17 @ 12:20 PM
So my other half and I moved into a new build semi detached house on a housing estate 11 months ago. There is a driveway capable of holding 2 cars allocated for each house. Our attached neighbours moved in a month later, they have 2 cars like we do. However, the man is extremely obnoxious and goes out of his way to 'intimidate' us and other neighbours by parking his car in front off our a house, often leaving his car jutting out in the road (which is quite narrow for people to pass).There is a lamppost which clearly defines the boundary between our 2 houses. Yet he feels the need to park across both houses, when there is only one car and often times no car parked on his drive. I don't know if he does it to satisfy his ego by 'marking his terrority' or something. Needless to say, It's incredibly frustrating because the man is, from what we can tell abit of a psycho. We hear them both arguing every day and what sounds like him chucking objects around the room in a rage. Sometimes the arguing gets so bad our other neighbours can hear it in their detached houses across the street! This alone is bad enough but his sheer arrogance and intimidating demeanour have left us resenting our own home. What can we do? because we feel powerless living next to this cretin.
Frustrated - 8-Aug-17 @ 2:14 PM
WE have new neighbours moved in. They have a drive way and 3 cars, 2 ppl. One 4x4, 1 mini and a huge tal van parked in front of my house blocking the light and they keep their drive way clear. What can I do about thenm being so unneighbourly and selfish inconsidarete.
Mine - 8-Aug-17 @ 10:01 AM
Hi, we have off road parking spots which accomodates 4 vehicles on my side of the road next to garages. My side of the road has maisonettes where there are no drives so it's parking half on/half off the path. Is it possible to have an official sign saying "residents only" for the 4 off road spaces as residents across the road (with drives!) are abusing the little space we have by parking their friends cars their whilst they go on holiday for days and weeks at a time. Is there any legal route where we can make it "residential only" due to the limited space to actual residents that need those spaces.
grommy - 7-Aug-17 @ 5:42 PM
Hi, I moved in my house over a year ago and the parking is horrendous, one guy in particular has three spaces out of a possible nine.He has a drive, garage and a parking space, when I spoke to him he said he has lived here for over 30 years so get used to it. Mmm. I live in a street square with eight houses and nine parking spaces, surely that's at least one each?To make things worse this same guy actually bought a car just to leave in HIS space so no one else can park there and if you do he's going to block you in so you don't do it again. A bit commonsense please. Yours: Littlebigman
Littlebigman - 26-Jun-17 @ 4:03 PM
Kazz- Your Question:
The guy in front of us keeps blocking our car in , we have had a run in about it before so we think he's doing it purposely now. He has built what looks like a hard standing on his back which faces the front of our house , we found out he has no planning permission for this and since that he's turned quite nasty ! He parks 3 vehicles on the road in front of our house , he doesn't live in his house he has done it up and is selling up , he purposely blocks our car in and leaves room so he can fit in another of his cars behind his ! Can we do anything about the s ? Like inform anyone at all ? He was there at the crack of dawn moving his car and AGAiN blocked our car in !! The stress is killing me !!

Our Response:
If you can't actually get your car out of your drive, then the local police may be willing to intervene and treat it as an obstruction. Private legal action for inconsiderate parking could be take on the grounds ofa nuisance (interference with your use and enjoyment of your property).
ProblemNeighbours - 26-Jun-17 @ 11:43 AM
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