Home > Neighbour Issues > Parking Disputes Between Neighbours

Parking Disputes Between Neighbours

By: Jeff Durham - Updated: 20 Jan 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Parking Disputes Obstruct Neighbour

Many conflicts between neighbours arise as the result of disputes over parked cars. Of course, if you have a separate driveway then there isn’t a problem, as long as you actually park on it, but issues do arise when people park their cars on the road upon which they live.

Having off street parking not only increases the value of a property but it also reduce the risk of neighbour arguments over where to park the car. In some residential areas, often London, parking permits are charged at a premium rate and don't always resolve the parking problems, as residents think they have a right to park in front of their house since they have paid for a permit.

The Highway Code is there to explain and guide you through the rules and regulations set out in myriad pieces of traffic and road legislation.For example:

  • Drivers should all be aware that you cannot park or wait on double yellow lines at any time.
  • You must not wait or park on single yellow lines at the times stated on corresponding signs.
  • You must not wait, stop, or park on school entrance markings.
  • Unless you are entitled to, you must not park in disabled parking spaces or resident parking spaces.
  • You must also not park in front of the entrance to a property.
There are many more rules which you should read and be aware of before taking any action, you can find the full list at www.gov.uk

Many parking disputes arise over the failure to observe parking ‘etiquette’ on the street where you live. But etiquette and the law are two totally different issues, so let’s take a look at both.

What The Law Says

As long as your vehicle is taxed and you are not contravening any other traffic laws, you are allowed to park anywhere on a public highway (but not on footpaths/pavements) where it is legal to do so.

Parking Outside Your Own House

Etiquette, good manners and common sense are the main ingredients in avoiding parking disputes with your neighbours. Most people would choose to park outside their own home anyway because of the convenience, but what if you have more than one vehicle belonging to a single property and there are no driveways or you have a driveway but there is only enough room for one car?

No Automatic Right to Park Outside Your Home

Basically, it’s an unwritten ‘rule’ that people will generally tend to park outside their own home but it’s important to note that no one has an automatic right to do so. It’s not always possible and, in addition to residents, other road users also have the right to park outside your home providing they are not contravening the Highway Code.

To resolve this issue, the only thing you can do is to try to have a friendly word with your neighbour and explain to them why you’d prefer to park in front of your own house. You may find that they didn’t realise it bothered you and often simple courtesy and communicating your issue with your neighbour will resolve the problem.

Shared Driveways

If you share a driveway with your next door neighbour and a parking dispute occurs because of lack of space or one person’s vehicle is taking up more space, you can resolve this by checking your house deeds to find out where the boundaries lie.

Accessibility and Upkeep of a Shared Driveway

It’s courteous to share responsibilities for the accessibility and tidiness of a shared driveway. If you have children, make sure you keep any toys off the other person's part of the shared driveway. If your next door neighbour simply decides they’ve had enough and drives straight in and ‘accidentally’ runs over a children’s toy, you’ve no legal redress – it’s your neighbour’s part of the driveway and your responsibility to keep things that belong to you, on your side.

The Big Issue – Parking Directly In Front Of A Person’s Driveway

This is, by far, the single most frequent cause of annoyance and arguments between neighbours. Unfortunately though, the law does not help in this regard. It's common courtesy not to park directly in front of the driveway of another person’s property. After all, they may need to get in or out of the driveway with their vehicle. If you’ve blocked the access by parking directly in front of it, this will cause the vast majority, if not everybody, to become annoyed and to try to locate the owner of the vehicle to get them to move it. Therefore, most neighbourly people will never park directly in front of someone’s driveway.

What is the Relevant Law on Blocking Someone's Driveway?

The Highway Code, paragraph 207, asks that people DO NOT park their vehicle where it might cause an obstruction to other pedestrians or road users, and cites the example of not parking in front of another person’s driveway.

In essence, while there are certain rules and regulations under the Highway Code relating to parking on public highways, mostly it’s a matter of common decency and courtesy. Speaking calmly to neighbours and explaining reasons why you might need to park here or there, if practical, will usually result in you getting what you want. Just remember, however, that unless they are breaking the law, people are entitled to park anywhere they want to on a public highway providing they aren’t in breach of the Highway Code. If things get really bad, you could try and get a third party involved to mediate...take a look at our feature When Mediation Can Help Neighbour disputes for more information and advice.

Dropped Kerbs: The Traffic Management Act 2004

If you have a dropped kerb at the end of your driveway (which in most local authorities - planning laws say that you should), the Traffic Management Act 2004 might help you. This act covers restrictions on parking where a kerb has been dropped for a number of reasons including for the purpose of "assisting vehicles entering or leaving the carriageway across the footway, cycle track or verge". There are exceptions to this including:
  • Where the vehicle is parked outside residential premises "by or with the consent (but not consent given for reward) of the occupier of the premises" but this exception does not apply in the case of a shared driveway
  • Emergency vehicles
  • When a vehicle is being used for the purposes of delivering goods/unloading etc at the premises (has to be 'reasonable' and for no longer than 20 minutes)
  • Vehicles undertaking any building, signing, utilities or sewer works or collecting waste on behalf of local authority, removing a traffic obstruction

If you think you could have a case under this piece of legislation, first try to find and speak to the vehicle owner. In a friendly and polite manner, tell them about the act and that you'd like to get your vehicle out. If they refuse, call the police on 101 - not 999 (it's more than likely NOT an emergency and if it is, the vehicle owner will probably cooperate with you anyhow). Tell them about the problem, how long the vehicle has been there and that you need to get your car out. If they say there's nothing they can do, ask them about the Traffic Management act of 2004 (referring to dropped kerbs) and what they normal steps are. They should be able to help you to take the right steps even if they won't do anything themselves immediately.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
[Add a Comment]
Hi my neighbours are terrible when we first moved in the man next door came round to ask me to move my car I have a drive way big enough for one car and we also own another car couple of months after we settled in another knock at the door asking us to move our car parked outside our house they have around 5 car spaces outside there house so plently of space the third time there was a knock he came round verbally abusing me and my partner as since he keeps parking his car outside my house so we can only just fit the car on the driveway and my other nearly blocks that off. What can I do?? Any laws?
Srm - 20-Jan-17 @ 4:20 PM
My neighbours daughters continue to park they're cars on the drop kerb between my property and they're mothers. This is causing a problem when people need to cross the road and cannot get into the footpath safely. Where does the law stand on this? I've tried speaking to her nicely but just get verbal/racial abuse, which she now directs to anyone who comes to my property with a car.
Chelle - 20-Jan-17 @ 1:48 PM
Hi I have a problem with my neighbour, we live almost in an L shape but between the two houses is a field that has access by a thin strip of tarmac just wide enough for a small car to drive on. However I park my car on my front garden which is fine, but as my neighbour has such a small garden at the front of her home she parks on the shared access tarmac. Which blocks the field access and my back gates and garage. She gets angry and tells me to move my car right up on my front garden but sure I can park wherever I want on my garden. I also plan to take my car around the side of my house where I have a garage. However this would mean she would have to move her car off the shared access tarmac and right over on to her small garden or park on the road. Because really no one should park on the shared tarmac as its an access to the field. Is there any help you could give me please
Jamie82 - 19-Jan-17 @ 8:52 PM
I own a house and there are 2 flats next door owned by the council. Previous owners of my propertyought part of next doors driveway from the council and the deeds were changed. The transaction was to create a full width driveway up the side of my house and into the back garden where there is a garage. There is a 10 metre tarmacadamed access with a dropped kerb that was installed at the same time. In the last 6 months there has been a visitor to a flat next door where the tenant has a long term illness. The visitor is having difficulty walking and, without asking, parks on the 10 metre section. Usual parking is from 2 to 4 hours but recently he has left the vehicle overnight. I am currently not able to drive due to medical conditions and have sold my car. My question is at what point, if I say nothing, does the driver get rights due to oastvactivity that is unchallenged?
Stu b - 18-Jan-17 @ 11:50 PM
Hi, I live in a house with its own driveway on a busy A road in Staffordshire. Just before Christmas, a very large white van started to appear (the type with two or three rows of seats in the back as well as a large storage area and often used by roads / rail maintenance) and started to park partly on a verge / pavement between myself and my neighbour. The owner of the van lives in a row of terraced houses just down the road and they park a car in front of their property. The issue is that it is totally blocking visibility down the road as we are leaving our drive and emerging onto the A road and for my neighbour the van is parked in such a way as to be two or three yards from her driveway meaning she cannot see anything. For both us and our neighbour, we are therefore having to pull out into the road (30mph limit but people drive much faster, including large lorries accessing nearby quarries) quite far before we can see anything and have already had three near misses. I have spoken to the owner and politely asked them to move the van, explaining the issues it is creating and although there is a free public car park 2 to 3 minutes walk away, she refuses to park there as she doesn't want to walk. She has also said she will not swap her car and van over and park the van outside her own house as it will block her view and overlap her neighbours windows and she doesn't want the grief. She maintains she has a legal right to park where she is but, given the visibility issues she is causing is there any recourse to force her to move the vehicle?
Staffsresident - 18-Jan-17 @ 5:34 PM
Hi, I live in a house with its own driveway on a busy A road in Staffordshire. Just before Christmas, a very large white van started to appear (the type with two or three rows of seats in the back as well as a large storage area and often used by roads / rail maintenance) and started to park partly on a verge / pavement between myself and my neighbour. The owner of the van lives in a row of terraced houses just down the road and they park a car in front of their property. The issue is that it is totally blocking visibility down the road as we are leaving our drive and emerging onto the A road and for my neighbour the van is parked in such a way as to be two or three yards from her driveway meaning she cannot see anything. For both us and our neighbour, we are therefore having to pull out into the road (30mph limit but people drive much faster, including large lorries accessing nearby quarries) quite far before we can see anything and have already had three near misses. I have spoken to the owner and politely asked them to move the van, explaining the issues it is creating and although there is a free public car park 2 to 3 minutes walk away, she refuses to park there as she doesn't want to walk. She has also said she will not swap her car and van over and park the van outside her own house as it will block her view and overlap her neighbours windows and she doesn't want the grief. She maintains she has a legal right to park where she is but, given the visibility issues she is causing is there any recourse to force her to move the vehicle?
Staffsresident - 18-Jan-17 @ 12:59 PM
SBennettuk82 - Your Question:
We have a driveway however a resident who lives in the house opposite parks their van next to our driveway which obstructs our view of oncoming vehicles regardless of whether or not we reverse off our driveway or drive off it facing the road. There have been incidents where our car has been almost hit by oncoming traffic that we cannot see and our young kids have been in the car. The resident in question owns their own driveway which they park 2 cars on. We have kindly asked them not to park their van where it is because it has almost caused collisions on numerous occasions but they have refused. They could even park it in front of their own driveway but refuse to. What can we do about it?

Our Response:
If they are actually obstructing your driveway meaning you cannot exit your property, you can contact the police who talk to the vehicle owner; they may also be willing to do so on the basis that you feel it's dangerous (but that's unlikely). If the road is a public road and there are no other parking restrictions in place, there is not a great deal you can do. Your local council planning department or your title deeds may include information about any restrictions in pace relating to commercial vehicles in residential areas, so that's worth investigating.
ProblemNeighbours - 18-Jan-17 @ 11:53 AM
We have a driveway however a resident who lives in the house opposite parks their van next to our driveway which obstructs our view of oncoming vehicles regardless of whether or not we reverse off our driveway or drive off it facing the road. There have been incidents where our car has been almost hit by oncoming traffic that we cannot see and our young kids have been in the car. The resident in question owns their own driveway which they park 2 cars on. We have kindly asked them not to park their van where it is because it has almost caused collisions on numerous occasions but they have refused. They could even park it in front of their own driveway but refuse to. What can we do about it?
SBennettuk82 - 17-Jan-17 @ 2:17 AM
I live in a terrace of 6 houses and communal parking is adjacent to the properties. Mine is the first block closest to the entrance of the road. The family who live in the corner house of the main road you turn off into our road have about 5 cars and constantly park at least 2 of them in our communal parking constantly leaving us residents with no where to park. I have asked politely for them not to park there but he just ignores us and takes any space he wishes every single day. Can I do anything about this.He also has a number of cameras on the side of his house that record the communal parking area and we know he watches it to watch us.
Caz - 15-Jan-17 @ 7:53 PM
Hi My wife and i live in a terrace house and usually get to park behind each another infront of house. We take up our house and a bit of next door and have so for past 3 years when we can(neighbour doesnt have car so works fine)But.... Recently a neighbour 5 doors down parks his work van taking up 2 places instead(he really cant park ,if parked normal, closer to another car, someone could park easily). he also takes up space up on our other next door neighbour aswell with his other car (using 2 spaces as parks way away from counterflow in street). aswell as his partners car outside thier house. Meaning we park at end of street with cars out of site.. little worrying. Could you suggest what to do other than mutter under my breath that he cant park. We understand we cant park outside our house everynight but how do we tell someone he cant park properly? And is wasting space for other people could use to park? Thanks Grumpy Man
Higgy89 - 13-Jan-17 @ 9:24 PM
Hi, We live in a lower cottage flat with the neighbour upstairs having a driveway at the side leading to a garage at the rear.The driveway is also used for access to my rear garden and for taking bins out.Recently a new person has moved in and keep blocking the pathway with their car.are there any rules or laws against this? Thanks
Dave - 13-Jan-17 @ 10:08 AM
Jeffers - Your Question:
I own my own house and have a garage on block but my neighbour has his garage next to mine there are four garages in all and never had a problem until my old neighbour moved and new ones moved in their garage is next to their house ours next to there's but they have been told by the previous owners they have two parking spaces so behind his vehicle his family park and this blocks our gate where we can't get out if we took up two spaces he would not be able to park in his garage so we keep telling we use the back gate and not to keep parking there who has the rights to this as this is my back garden with a gate I use constantly.

Our Response:
Your neighbour's deeds should explain where access is needed and what's acceptable in terms of parking. Drop them a note (there are some examples in our Letter templates section) - if that doesn't do the trick, you might need to suggest that you're taking legal action.
ProblemNeighbours - 10-Jan-17 @ 10:35 AM
MaryLou - Your Question:
I have a problem with a neighbour who parks his van outside our lounge window blocking our view. He has three cars one of which he parks in his driveway. We have spoken to him on several occasions and said that as a compromise he could park it outside my bedroom window not blocking the view at all ( I live in a bungalow). He said.he would and today he has parked it outside the lounge window again. Not good for the blood pressure. His 3 cars are outside his house and his large white van is outside mine. What can I do?

Our Response:
Check with your local council. Some areas have regulations about the parking of commercial vehicles in residential areas.
ProblemNeighbours - 9-Jan-17 @ 12:07 PM
I own my own house and have a garage on block but my neighbour has his garage next to mine there are four garages in all and never had a problem until my old neighbour moved and new ones moved in their garage is next to their house ours next to there's but they have been told by the previous owners they have two parking spaces so behind his vehicle his family park and this blocks our gate where we can't get out if we took up two spaces he would not be able to park in his garage so we keep telling we use the back gate and not to keep parking there who has the rights to this as this is my back garden with a gate I use constantly.
Jeffers - 9-Jan-17 @ 8:00 AM
I have a neighbour who has an empty garage where until recently he kept a (Prince Charles Dog) at night the dog was put in one of these small metal cages when the owners went to bed and let out when they went to work, and have shown no love at all towards the lovely dog and no heating provided for the dog. Anyway I digress, only two of them drive but they have 1 x van + 1 x 4x4 and 2 cars. They have a drive as long as a runway and have now started to park on their front lawn pointing towards their front room window. What is amazing as well is the front house curtains are forever closed all year round.
stpetersburg - 8-Jan-17 @ 2:58 PM
I have a problem with a neighbour who parks his van outside our lounge window blocking our view. He has three cars one of which he parks in his driveway. We have spoken to him on several occasions and said that as a compromise he could park it outside my bedroom window not blocking the view at all ( I live in a bungalow). He said.he would and today he has parked it outside the lounge window again. Not good for the blood pressure. His 3 cars are outside his house and his large white van is outside mine. What can I do?
MaryLou - 7-Jan-17 @ 3:56 PM
I live in a road that is a mixture of flats and houses. All the houses have driveways and there is a small car park for residents in the flats. A relative of one of house owners has left 3 cars in the car park 24/7 for months and never moved them - leaving me to park on another street. Why do people think this is acceptable?
TiredDavid - 3-Jan-17 @ 11:08 PM
Need a bit of advice, I rent my home from my local housing association and with the house I have a allocated parking space and the use of 3 visitors parking spaces if needed, the parking is a nightmare at the best of times, but has got worst since my neighbours, who are on the same housing association as myself, moved in. They have 3 cars, one is parked in their allocated parking space and they use 2 of the visitor spaces, my problem is that 2 of the cars they own have no tax or mot and just sitin the parking spaces 24/7 and never move,and they get very angry at myself when I park in a visitor space, I have spoken to my housing officer and the police about the cars and there doesn't seem to be anything anyone can do to help, so any advice would be great. Thank you allicat
Allicat - 3-Jan-17 @ 7:57 PM
We live in a small private dul de sac only 4 houses. on our deeds the land up to the boundry wall belongs to us. The neigbour at the bottom house has a garage and a space outside garage to park. They have a van parked outside garage then a car parked in turning point then another car parked very often behind the van on our land. We can't get out of our drive because turning point has car and it is very tight. We have to give them access only but they insist on parking on our land. What can we do as we have tried reasoning with them but they take no notice
Pammy - 3-Jan-17 @ 6:52 PM
Parking is really bad where my partner lives, I have had to start parking at the top of the road now. I don't block anyones drive way or block anyone frome getting in out ect. They have left a note on my car saying that this is there parking area (public foot path) they have a drive way which they don't use. They said if I park there they will call the police and they have taken pictures of my car. I have also taken pictures to prove that I have not blocked any drive way. I just think its petty that they couldn't talk to me and think that just because its outside there house they think they own it.....a public foot path!!!
Cat - 2-Jan-17 @ 1:28 PM
i live on a main road my neighbour has a big pick up truck at least once a week some crashes in to it. it blocks half of the road off. people think the truck belongs to my house but it dosnt he just parks its out said.if you say anything to him he says until you pay my road tax i will park and do what i like
False nails - 2-Jan-17 @ 11:04 AM
Hi I live on the end of a terraced row of three. I share a drive between the terreced on the left and a semi on the right. Each house as a garage at the back and drive way in front of the garage and ample parking on the lane at the front. My garage is on the left at the back of my house. The middle one. The first is middle neighbours and the end one the opposite end of terraced. I don't have terrific relations with next door. The son aged 20 persistently parks on my drive whilst I am out. We had crossed words last summer regarding this. Having just returned home to find his car on my drive. I waited and pondered whilst he rushed out of the house and drove away. It's against the law for me to obstruct his parents car on there drive and block him in on mine. Honestly I find it rude and bad mannered, I live on my own with two children and get the feeling it wouldn't happened if a man lived here. I have polity and crossly asked him not to do this to be told he's unloading. Any suggestions please as I am tiring of it all now. Thank you
AnnLouise - 24-Dec-16 @ 2:27 PM
Kaarick - Your Question:
We have lived in our house for almost 10 years. On our deeds the 'road' outside of our house is our land and within our boundaries. There is no access as we live in a cul de sac and we are in the corner so there is nowhere to go. We had problems when we first moved in with people from further down the road parking and blocking our access to our drive and leaving us with nowhere to park. As a result the house builders put signs up on our fences advising there was no parking apart from for us. These faded and we subsequently replaced them - so they now do not have the Barrett logo. We have had no problems.Now, our next door neighbours house is up for sale and I have just seen the potential buyers taking photos of these signs. My question is what can I do to minimise any risk? Is there something I am not aware of that could be enforced so that we have to remove the signs? Are there any actions I could take in the meantime?

Our Response:
If your deeds say that the road outside is your land, then you can erect a sign saying "no parking private property" etc. If someone prevents you from exiting your drive, you can ask the police to intervene on the basis of an obstruction. If you someone persistently parks there, you could take a civil legal action on the basis of a nuisance caused or trespass (if that part of the road is truly yours and doesn't belong to all the homeowners on the road of course).
ProblemNeighbours - 19-Dec-16 @ 12:04 PM
We live in a small village in Cornwall.Outside our house (which we own)is a lay by which is our property, it is on the deeds.In the past we have had no problems with letting neighbours park there if they ask first. Recently new tenants have moved in across the lane and have persisted in parking on the lay by, churning up the surface and preventing our own visitors from parking there.Among the vehicles parking in the layby is a large insightly van.No one has asked if they can do this, despite notices clearly stating private parking only. Last night, my son moved a large planter onto the layby to be confronted by the neighbour in question. On explaining ( politely) that we are fed up with the parking situation and that we could do what we like on our own land, she called him a w*****r.This morning the planter had been moved to the middle of our gate, blocking the driveway. Suggestions please?
Leygroves - 18-Dec-16 @ 8:37 AM
Hi. I hope someone can help..ive lived jn my home for 5 years now single mum with 4 little kids. Im also a full time carer for my mum who doesnt live with me..my neighbour made me feel really uncomfortable by standing and staring at me and anyone who came round. To stop that I had a high fence put up. It cost me alot im still paying it off 3 years on. He still looks over tho but not as often. Now he parks across my drop kerb. I dont have a drive as I have a ramp for mums wheelchair. I park across my drop kerb for easy access to the house. Befor I have had to block the road, get the wheelchair out put mum in it, leave her inside the garden by the ramp. Then go park the car somewhere( he has parked so close to the drop kerb I cant get my car in.) Get back to mum asap. I cant talk to them because they have got aggressive before. Can someone please advise me. Thank u.
Sarah - 17-Dec-16 @ 9:05 PM
We have lived in our house for almost 10 years. On our deeds the 'road' outside of our house is our land and within our boundaries. There is no access as we live in a cul de sac and we are in the corner so there is nowhere to go. We had problems when we first moved in with people from further down the road parking and blocking our access to our drive and leaving us with nowhere to park. As a result the house builders put signs up on our fences advising there was no parking apart from for us. These faded and we subsequently replaced them - so they now do not have the Barrett logo. We have had no problems. Now, our next door neighbours house is up for sale and I have just seen the potential buyers taking photos of these signs. My question is what can I do to minimise any risk? Is there something I am not aware of that could be enforced so that we have to remove the signs? Are there any actions I could take in the meantime?
Kaarick - 17-Dec-16 @ 11:41 AM
I just bought a house and share a driveway with apartments next door. They say I have to park in certain spot in my side so they can get there car in between my car and other renter. But on other side of there apartments they have other driveway no one parks in. I have friends and family come over they have to park in street so they don't block there way to get around cars.
Danman - 14-Dec-16 @ 2:29 PM
I've just moved into a new house with my sister, we each have a car. The parking etiquette seemed to be everyone parked on the other side of the road to my house, in a line, so cars etc could still drive through. That's fine and we fell in line. However, the two houses opp us both park outside their own houses and often leave a small gap between their cars (mines only little so I can fit in) however if someone else is there and I come home I will just park behind them (and resultingly outside the woman opposites me house) every time I do this she comes home later and parks so close to my car it's honestly a wonder how she's getting so close without hitting it! I've even taken pictures! On one occasion she was so close I couldn't physically open the boot because it hit her bonnet. I've also witnessed on 3 separate occasions from my bedroom her out on the street standing beside my car shouting and swearing throwing her hands in the air complaining about my parking there. Her husband has even got in his van and went and parked behind me and honked his horn continuously for about a minute just to I assume prove a point. Coincidentally one morning I also came out and my back tyre was flat - no puncture or whole... just all the air let out?!? Obv I can't prove anything and hopefully I've gotten across how intimidating and scary this man and woman's behaviour is, and you can understand why I really don't want to go across and speak to them in a 'friendly' was as everyone seems to advise. Is there anything at all that can be done? I feel threatened in my own home and am constantly watching out the window terrified something's going to happen to my car. My sister has taken to parking behind me now if this woman isn't in as she knows I'm getting stressed, and as I write this the woman has come home, parked right up my sisters cars behind and got out her car shouting about people not parking properly ... I know I can park elsewhere to save peace but I pay my road tax just the same as everyone else and to make things worse... she has a driveway (we don't have anything) and I've never once seen her use it ?!? Thanks
Christmas - 8-Dec-16 @ 9:40 PM
Maddie - Your Question:
I manage a private nursing home with a large private car park on our land which you need to pass through a large walled entrance to reach. We do not have a barrier as we need access for ambulance services at all time. We have a neighbour living in the same street who insists on parking her car and the cars she is selling on our land. We have asked her politely to refrain from doing so but she said it is her right to park where ever she wants. What can we do.

Our Response:
You will probably need to take legal action. The police may be able to help you in the first instance though. Could you try pop up parking posts or chains across the spaces themselves? Or simply blocking her exit on several occasions so she has to come and ask to be let out?!
ProblemNeighbours - 8-Dec-16 @ 12:27 PM
Deb - Your Question:
All the houses along our road have long driveways allowing parking for many vehicles. We live on a busy main road where although the speed limit is 40mph most travel in excess of this. My neighbour has 2 cars on his driveway which are not roadworthy & he does not use. He also has another car which he uses but parks on the very end of his driveway right up against our driveway and consequently this obscures our view of pulling out onto the main road. To be able to see we have to pull out onto the road to be able to see beyond his car. Is there anything we can do legally to stop him obstructing our view. Sometimes he parks so close to the edge that 2 wheels are actually overhanging the footpath. We do not have an amicable relationship so he would not be cooperative with a polite request from us.

Our Response:
If the neighbour is actually parking on his own private land there isn't anything you can do about this. The times when he is parking so that the wheels are on the footpath could be dealt with by the police if this causes an obstruction for pedestrians.
ProblemNeighbours - 7-Dec-16 @ 11:31 AM
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice...
Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Latest Comments
Further Reading...
Our Most Popular...
Add to my Yahoo!
Add to Google
Stumble this
Add to Twitter
Add To Facebook
RSS feed
You should seek independent professional advice before acting upon any information on the ProblemNeighbours website. Please read our Disclaimer.